A case of bilateral perisylvian syndrome with reading disability

Mark A. Eckert*, Virginia W. Berninger, Fumiko Hoeft, Kenneth I. Vaden Jr.,

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bilateral Perisylvian Syndrome (BPS) often presents with epilepsy and significant behavioral impairments that can include mental retardation, dysarthria, delayed speech development, and delayed fine motor development (Graff-Radford et al., 1986 and Kuzniecky et al., 1993). While a small subset of BPS cases have been described as having relatively isolated language delays (Leventer et al., 2010), BPS is not expected in children with dyslexia. As part of a Medical University of South Carolina, IRB approved multi-site study involving retrospective and de-identified dyslexia data, we unexpectedly identified a 14.05 year old male with evidence of BPS whose father had been diagnosed with dyslexia and dysgraphia. This child had been recruited for a neuroimaging study on dyslexia from a school specializing in educating children with dyslexia. The T1-weighted MRI scan from this child demonstrated a highly unusual perisylvian sulcal/gyral patterning that is a defining feature of BPS (Fig. 1). BPS cases exhibit bilateral dysgenesis of the Sylvian fissure and surrounding gyri, which appears to occur because of a limited or absent arcuate fasciculus (Kilinc, Ekinci, Demirkol, & Agan, 2015). This BPS case also had a relatively enlarged atrium of the lateral ventricle that is consistent with the BPS anatomical presentation and reduction of parietal white matter (Graff-Radford et al., 1986, Kilinc et al., 2015 and Toldo et al., 2011).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-124
Number of pages4
JournalCortex
Volume76
Early online date19 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Bibliographical note

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Keywords

  • bilateral perisylvian syndrome
  • dyslexia
  • reading disability
  • Sylvian fissure

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