A comparison of beta-amyloid deposition in the medial temporal lobe in sporadic Alzheimer's disease, Down's syndrome and normal elderly brains

Richard A. Armstrong*, Nigel J. Cairns, D. Myers, C.U.M. Smith, Peter L. Lantos, M.N. Rossor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The density of beta-amyloid (A beta) deposits was studied in the medial temporal lobe in non-demented individuals and in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) and Down's syndrome (DS). No A beta deposits were recorded in six of the non-demented cases, while in a further eight cases, these were confined to either the lateral occipitotemporal or parahippocampal gyrus. The mean density of A beta deposits in the cortex was greater in SAD and DS than in non-demented cases but with overlap between patient groups. The mean density of A beta deposits was greater in DS than SAD consistent with a gene dosage effect. The ratio of primitive to diffuse A beta deposits was greater in DS and in non-demented cases than in SAD and the ratio of classic to diffuse deposits was lowest in DS. In all groups, A beta deposits occurred in clusters which were often regularly distributed. In the cortex, the dimension of the A beta clusters was greater in SAD than in the non-demented cases and DS. The data suggest that the development of A beta pathology in the hippocampus could be a factor in the development of DS and SAD. Furthermore, the high density of A beta deposits, and in particular the high proportion of primitive type deposits, may be important in DS while the development of large clusters of A beta deposits may be a factor in SAD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1996

Keywords

  • deposition
  • sporadic Alzheimer's disease
  • Down's syndrome
  • non-demented brains
  • beta-amyloid

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