A longitudinal pre-pregnancy to post-delivery comparison of genetic and gestational surrogate and intended mothers: Confidence and genealogy

Olga B A Van Den Akker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

For women opting to use surrogacy to overcome subfertility, a choice can be made to have a genetically related or unrelated baby. Similarly, women opting to become surrogate mothers also have to choose to gestate and relinquish a genetically related or unrelated baby. This study explored the cognitions behind the initial choices made and determined the strength of those cognitions six months post-delivery of the surrogate baby. Surrogate and Intended mothers ( N = 81) undergoing Artificial Insemination (AI, genetic) or Embryo Transfer (ET, gestational) were studied separately (four groups) at the start of their surrogate arrangement and those with a positive outcome ( n = 34) were re-interviewed at six months post-relinquishment. There were significant differences between surrogate and intended mothers in their confidence about the arrangement. Beliefs about the importance of a genetic link were predictors of ET arrangements. Responses were consistent over a one and a half-year study period. The ethical and clinical implications of the results are discussed in relation to appropriate self-selection and confidence with the surrogate process and the importance of genetic offspring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-284
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Cognitive dissonance
  • Genetic
  • Gestational
  • Surrogacy

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