A new perspective on the female expatriate experience: the role of host country national categorization

Arup Varma*, Soo Min Toh, Pawan Budhwar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was designed to investigate host country national (HCN) categorization of female expatriates, in two samples-U.S. and India. Two hundred and twenty-two HCNs (104 in the U.S. and 118 in India) participated in the study. Consistent with prior research [e.g., Tung, R. L. (1998). American expatriates abroad: From neophytes to cosmopolitans. Journal of World Business, 33: 125-140], we found that female expatriates from the U.S. were not discriminated against. Indeed, we found that female expatriates from the U.S. were preferred by Indian HCNs, as co-workers, significantly more than male expatriates from the U.S. We discuss implications for organizations and offer suggestions for future research. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-120
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of World Business
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

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Host country nationals
Female expatriates
India
Expatriates
Workers

Keywords

  • host country national
  • HCN
  • categorization
  • female expatriates
  • US
  • India
  • discrimination
  • male expatriates
  • organizations

Cite this

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A new perspective on the female expatriate experience : the role of host country national categorization. / Varma, Arup; Toh, Soo Min; Budhwar, Pawan.

In: Journal of World Business, Vol. 41, No. 2, 06.2006, p. 112-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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