A rapid ELISA for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter related sepsis caused by coagulase negative staphylococci

T. Worthington, P.A. Lambert, A. Traube, T.S.J. Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To develop and evaluate a rapid enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter related sepsis caused by coagulase negative staphylococci. Methods: Forty patients with a clinical and microbiological diagnosis of intravascular catheter related sepsis and positive blood cultures, caused by coagulase negative staphylococci, and 40 control patients requiring a central venous catheter as part of their clinical management were recruited into the study. Serum IgG responses to a previously undetected exocellular antigen produced by coagulase negative staphylococci, termed lipid S, were determined in the patient groups by a rapid ELISA. Results: There was a significant difference (p = < 0.0001) in serum IgG to lipid S between patients with catheter related sepsis and controls. The mean antibody titre in patients with sepsis caused by coagulase negative staphylococci was 10 429 (range, no detectable serum IgG antibody to 99 939), whereas serum IgG was not detected in the control group of patients. Conclusions: The rapid ELISA offers a simple, economical, and rapid diagnostic test for suspected intravascular catheter related sepsis caused by coagulase negative staphylococci, which can be difficult to diagnose clinically. This may facilitate treatment with appropriate antimicrobials and may help prevent the unnecessary removal of intravascular catheters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-43
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Clinical Pathology
Volume55
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2002

Keywords

  • enzyme linked immunosorbent assay
  • coagulase negative staphylococci
  • catheter infections

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