An investigation of the willingness of managerial employees to accept an expatriate assignment

Samuel Aryee, Y.W. Chay, J. Chew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Data obtained with the aid of structured questionnaires from a Singaporean managerial sample (N = 228) were used to examine receptivity to an expatriate assignment in terms of the cultural similarity or dissimilarity of the country of relocation. Results of a paired t-test indicated that respondents were significantly more receptive to an expatriate assignment in a culturally similar location than in a culturally dissimilar location. Results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed mixed support for the study's propositions and explained only modest amounts of the variance in the culturally similar (R2 = 22 per cent) and dissimilar (R2 = 20 per cent) models. Limitations of the study, directions for future research and implications of the findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-283
Number of pages117
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jan 1996

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employee
move
Regression Analysis
regression
questionnaire
Employees
Willingness
Assignment
Expatriates
Surveys and Questionnaires
Hierarchical regression
Dissimilarity
Relocation
Questionnaire
T-test
Direction compound

Cite this

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An investigation of the willingness of managerial employees to accept an expatriate assignment. / Aryee, Samuel; Chay, Y.W.; Chew, J.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 17, 05.01.1996, p. 167-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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