An outbreak of Serratia marcescens on the neonatal unit

a tale of two clones

M.D. David, T.M.A. Welter, Peter A. Lambert, A.P. Fraise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Serratia spp. are an important cause of hospital-acquired infections and outbreaks in high-risk settings. Twenty-one patients were infected or colonized over a nine-month period during 2001-2002 on a neonatal unit. Twenty-two isolates collected were examined for antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase production and genotype. Random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that two clones were present. The first clone caused invasive clinical infection in four babies, and was subsequently replaced by a non-invasive clone that affected 14 babies. Phenotypically, the two strains also differed in their prodigiosin production; the first strain was non-pigmented whereas the second strain displayed pink-red pigmentation. Clinical features suggested a difference in their pathogenicity. No environmental source was found. The outbreak terminated following enhanced compliance with infection control measures and a change of antibiotic policy. Although S. marcescens continued to be isolated occasionally for another five months of follow-up, these were sporadic isolates with distinct molecular typing patterns. © 2005 The Hospital Infection Society.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-33
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006
Event11th Annual Conference of the Federation of Infection Societies - Cardiff, United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Nov 200425 Nov 2004

Fingerprint

Serratia marcescens
Disease Outbreaks
Clone Cells
Cross Infection
Prodigiosin
Hospital Societies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Serratia
Molecular Typing
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Pigmentation
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Infection Control
Virulence
Genotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection

Bibliographical note

This work was presented, in part, in poster format at the 11th Annual Conference of the Federation of Infection Societies, Cardiff, 23-25 November 2004.

Keywords

  • infection control
  • neonatal
  • outbreak
  • serratia marcescens

Cite this

David, M.D. ; Welter, T.M.A. ; Lambert, Peter A. ; Fraise, A.P. / An outbreak of Serratia marcescens on the neonatal unit : a tale of two clones. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2006 ; Vol. 63, No. 1. pp. 27-33.
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An outbreak of Serratia marcescens on the neonatal unit : a tale of two clones. / David, M.D.; Welter, T.M.A.; Lambert, Peter A.; Fraise, A.P.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 63, No. 1, 05.2006, p. 27-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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