Anticipatory control of long-range phase synchronization

Joachim Gross, Frank Schmitz, Irmtraud Schnitzler, Klaus Kessler, Kimron Shapiro, Bernhard Hommel, Alfons Schnitzler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Everyday human behaviour relies on our ability to predict outcomes on the basis of moment by moment information. Long-range neural phase synchronization has been hypothesized as a mechanism by which ‘predictions’ can exert an effect on the processing of incoming sensory events. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) we have studied the relationship between the modulation of phase synchronization in a cerebral network of areas involved in visual target processing and the predictability of target occurrence. Our results reveal a striking increase in the modulation of phase synchronization associated with an increased probability of target occurrence. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that long-range phase synchronization plays a critical functional role in humans' ability to effectively employ predictive heuristics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2057-2060
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2006

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Aptitude
Magnetoencephalography
Heuristics

Keywords

  • human
  • magnetoencephalography
  • networks
  • synchronization
  • visual attention
  • working memory

Cite this

Gross, J., Schmitz, F., Schnitzler, I., Kessler, K., Shapiro, K., Hommel, B., & Schnitzler, A. (2006). Anticipatory control of long-range phase synchronization. European Journal of Neuroscience, 24(7), 2057-2060. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.05082.x
Gross, Joachim ; Schmitz, Frank ; Schnitzler, Irmtraud ; Kessler, Klaus ; Shapiro, Kimron ; Hommel, Bernhard ; Schnitzler, Alfons. / Anticipatory control of long-range phase synchronization. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2006 ; Vol. 24, No. 7. pp. 2057-2060.
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Gross, J, Schmitz, F, Schnitzler, I, Kessler, K, Shapiro, K, Hommel, B & Schnitzler, A 2006, 'Anticipatory control of long-range phase synchronization', European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 2057-2060. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2006.05082.x

Anticipatory control of long-range phase synchronization. / Gross, Joachim; Schmitz, Frank; Schnitzler, Irmtraud; Kessler, Klaus; Shapiro, Kimron; Hommel, Bernhard; Schnitzler, Alfons.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 24, No. 7, 16.10.2006, p. 2057-2060.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Schnitzler, Alfons

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