Apparent motion photometry: evaluation and reliability of a novel method for the measurement of macular pigment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/aims Macular pigment is thought to protect the macula against exposure to light and oxidative stress, both of which may play a role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. The aim was to clinically evaluate a novel cathode-ray-tube-based method for measurement of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) known as apparent motion photometry (AMP).
Methods The authors took repeat readings of MPOD centrally (0°) and at 3° eccentricity for 76 healthy subjects (mean (±SD) 26.5±13.2 years, range 18–74 years).
Results The overall mean MPOD for the cohort was 0.50±0.24 at 0°, and 0.28±0.20 at 3° eccentricity; these values were significantly different (t=-8.905, p<0.001). The coefficients of repeatability were 0.60 and 0.48 for the 0 and 3° measurements respectively.
Conclusions The data suggest that when the same operator is taking repeated 0° AMP MPOD readings over time, only changes of more than 0.60 units can be classed as clinically significant. In other words, AMP is not suitable for monitoring changes in MPOD over time, as increases of this magnitude would not be expected, even in response to dietary modification or nutritional supplementation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages662-665
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume95
Issue number5
Early online date30 Aug 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

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Photometry
Reading
Cathode Ray Tube
Diet Therapy
Macular Degeneration
Macular Pigment
Healthy Volunteers
Oxidative Stress
Light

Bibliographical note

This article has been accepted for publication in the British journal of ophthalmology. The definitive copyedited, typeset version Bartlett, H & Eperjesi, F 2011, 'Apparent motion photometry: evaluation and reliability of a novel method for the measurement of macular pigment', British journal of ophthalmology, vol 95, no. 5, pp. 662-665 is available online at http://bjo.bmj.com/content/95/5/662

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • adult
  • aged
  • densitometry
  • female
  • humans
  • macula lutea
  • male
  • middle aged
  • movement
  • reproducibility of results
  • retinal pigments
  • young adult

Cite this

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abstract = "Background/aims Macular pigment is thought to protect the macula against exposure to light and oxidative stress, both of which may play a role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. The aim was to clinically evaluate a novel cathode-ray-tube-based method for measurement of macular pigment optical density (MPOD) known as apparent motion photometry (AMP). Methods The authors took repeat readings of MPOD centrally (0°) and at 3° eccentricity for 76 healthy subjects (mean (±SD) 26.5±13.2 years, range 18–74 years). Results The overall mean MPOD for the cohort was 0.50±0.24 at 0°, and 0.28±0.20 at 3° eccentricity; these values were significantly different (t=-8.905, p<0.001). The coefficients of repeatability were 0.60 and 0.48 for the 0 and 3° measurements respectively. Conclusions The data suggest that when the same operator is taking repeated 0° AMP MPOD readings over time, only changes of more than 0.60 units can be classed as clinically significant. In other words, AMP is not suitable for monitoring changes in MPOD over time, as increases of this magnitude would not be expected, even in response to dietary modification or nutritional supplementation.",
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author = "Hannah Bartlett and Frank Eperjesi",
note = "This article has been accepted for publication in the British journal of ophthalmology. The definitive copyedited, typeset version Bartlett, H & Eperjesi, F 2011, 'Apparent motion photometry: evaluation and reliability of a novel method for the measurement of macular pigment', British journal of ophthalmology, vol 95, no. 5, pp. 662-665 is available online at http://bjo.bmj.com/content/95/5/662",
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