Are self-directed parenting interventions sufficient for externalising behaviour problems in childhood? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Joanne Tarver, David Daley, Joanna Lockwood, Kapil Sayal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Externalising behaviour in childhood is a prevalent problem in the field of child and adolescent mental health. Parenting interventions are widely accepted as efficacious treatment options for reducing externalising behaviour, yet practical and psychological barriers limit their accessibility. This review aims to establish the evidence base of self-directed (SD) parenting interventions for externalising behaviour problems. Electronic searches of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Psychinfo, Embase and CENTRAL databases and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of SD interventions compared to no-treatment or active control groups. A random-effect meta-analysis estimated pooled standard mean difference (SMD) for SD interventions on measures of externalising child behaviour. Secondary analyses examined their effect on measures of parenting behaviour, parental stress and mood and parenting efficacy. Eleven eligible trials were included in the analyses. SD interventions had a large effect on parent report of externalising child behaviour (SMD = 1.01, 95 % CI: 0.77-1.24); although this effect was not upheld by analyses of observed child behaviour. Secondary analyses revealed effects of small to moderate magnitude on measures of parenting behaviour, parental mood and stress and parenting efficacy. An analysis comparing SD interventions with therapist-led parenting interventions revealed no significant difference on parent-reported measures of externalising child behaviour. SD interventions are associated with improvements in parental perception of externalising child behaviour and parental behaviour and well-being. Future research should further investigate the relative efficacy and cost-effectiveness of SD interventions compared to therapist-led interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1123-1137
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume23
Issue number12
Early online date20 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

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Parenting
Meta-Analysis
Child Behavior
Randomized Controlled Trials
Problem Behavior
PubMed
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Mental Health
Databases
Psychology
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Child Behavior Disorders/diagnosis
  • Humans
  • Parent-Child Relations
  • Parenting/psychology
  • Parents/psychology
  • Treatment Outcome

Cite this

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abstract = "Externalising behaviour in childhood is a prevalent problem in the field of child and adolescent mental health. Parenting interventions are widely accepted as efficacious treatment options for reducing externalising behaviour, yet practical and psychological barriers limit their accessibility. This review aims to establish the evidence base of self-directed (SD) parenting interventions for externalising behaviour problems. Electronic searches of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Psychinfo, Embase and CENTRAL databases and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of SD interventions compared to no-treatment or active control groups. A random-effect meta-analysis estimated pooled standard mean difference (SMD) for SD interventions on measures of externalising child behaviour. Secondary analyses examined their effect on measures of parenting behaviour, parental stress and mood and parenting efficacy. Eleven eligible trials were included in the analyses. SD interventions had a large effect on parent report of externalising child behaviour (SMD = 1.01, 95 {\%} CI: 0.77-1.24); although this effect was not upheld by analyses of observed child behaviour. Secondary analyses revealed effects of small to moderate magnitude on measures of parenting behaviour, parental mood and stress and parenting efficacy. An analysis comparing SD interventions with therapist-led parenting interventions revealed no significant difference on parent-reported measures of externalising child behaviour. SD interventions are associated with improvements in parental perception of externalising child behaviour and parental behaviour and well-being. Future research should further investigate the relative efficacy and cost-effectiveness of SD interventions compared to therapist-led interventions.",
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Are self-directed parenting interventions sufficient for externalising behaviour problems in childhood? A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Tarver, Joanne; Daley, David; Lockwood, Joanna; Sayal, Kapil.

In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 23, No. 12, 12.2014, p. 1123-1137.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are self-directed parenting interventions sufficient for externalising behaviour problems in childhood?

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Tarver, Joanne

AU - Daley, David

AU - Lockwood, Joanna

AU - Sayal, Kapil

PY - 2014/12

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KW - Parenting/psychology

KW - Parents/psychology

KW - Treatment Outcome

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DO - 10.1007/s00787-014-0556-5

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JO - European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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SN - 1018-8827

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