Are there two distinct populations of cored senile plaques in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type?

D. Myers, Richard A. Armstrong, C.U.M. Smith, R.A. Carter

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

The relationship between plaque diameter (PD) and core diameter (CD) was studied in four brains from each of four SDAT brains. The regions studied were parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), hippocampus, frontal and inferior temporal lobes. The largest diameters of 100 cored classical plaques and their cores were measured. CD was positively correlated with PD (Pearson's 'r' 0.4 - 0.95) in all region studied. Significant linear regressions of CD on PD with positive slopes (0.10 - 0.65) were found. Two distinct types of regression were found. Type A had a steep slope and a negative intercept on the ordinate whereas Type B had a shallow slope and a positive intercept. Both types can be found within the same brain but Type A or B predominate in a particular tissue. The data suggest that core development may occur either early or late in the development of the plaque. The two types of plaque may thus have different aetiologies. Such an interpretation is consistent with current ideas of plaque formation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 1987
EventJoint Meeting of the Brain Research Association and Alzheimer's Disease Society - Southampton (UK)
Duration: 22 Jul 198724 Jul 1987

Conference

ConferenceJoint Meeting of the Brain Research Association and Alzheimer's Disease Society
CitySouthampton (UK)
Period22/07/8724/07/87

Keywords

  • plaque diameter
  • core diameter
  • SDAT brains
  • brain

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    Myers, D., Armstrong, R. A., Smith, C. U. M., & Carter, R. A. (1987). Are there two distinct populations of cored senile plaques in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type?. Poster session presented at Joint Meeting of the Brain Research Association and Alzheimer's Disease Society, Southampton (UK), .