Beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels: laminar distribution in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease

Richard A. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The laminar distribution of diffuse, primitive and classic beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels was studied in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In most patients, the density of the diffuse and primitive Abeta deposits was greatest in the upper cortical layers and the classic deposits in the deeper cortical layers. The distribution of the larger blood vessels (>10 micron in diameter) was often bimodal with peaks in the upper and deeper cortical layers. The incidence of capillaries (<10 micron) was significantly higher in the deeper cortical layers in most patients. Multiple regression analysis selected vertical distance below the pia mater as the most significant factor correlated with the Abeta deposit density. With the exception of the classic deposits in two patients, there was no evidence that these vertical distributions were related to laminar variations in the incidence of large or small blood vessels.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-28
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience Research Communications
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Amyloid Plaques
Frontal Lobe
Amyloid
Blood Vessels
Alzheimer Disease
Pia Mater
Incidence
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Abeta deposits
  • blood vessels
  • laminar distribution
  • multiple regression

Cite this

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Beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels: laminar distribution in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. / Armstrong, Richard A.

In: Neuroscience Research Communications, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1996, p. 19-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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