Breakage model development and application with CFD for predicting breakage of whey protein precipitate particles

Nixon Zumaeta, Gregory Cartland-Glover, Sinead P. Heffernan, Edmond P. Byrne, John J. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Particle breakage due to fluid flow through various geometries can have a major influence on the performance of particle/fluid processes and on the product quality characteristics of particle/fluid products. In this study, whey protein precipitate dispersions were used as a case study to investigate the effect of flow intensity and exposure time on the breakage of these precipitate particles. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed to evaluate the turbulent eddy dissipation rate (TED) and associated exposure time along various flow geometries. The focus of this work is on the predictive modelling of particle breakage in particle/fluid systems. A number of breakage models were developed to relate TED and exposure time to particle breakage. The suitability of these breakage models was evaluated for their ability to predict the experimentally determined breakage of the whey protein precipitate particles. A "power-law threshold" breakage model was found to provide a satisfactory capability for predicting the breakage of the whey protein precipitate particles. The whey protein precipitate dispersions were propelled through a number of different geometries such as bends, tees and elbows, and the model accurately predicted the mean particle size attained after flow through these geometries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3443-3452
Number of pages10
JournalChemical Engineering Science
Volume60
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

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Precipitates
Computational fluid dynamics
Proteins
Geometry
Dispersions
Fluids
Flow of fluids
Particle size
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • computational fluid dynamics
  • dispersion
  • flow of fluids
  • precipitation (chemical)

Cite this

Zumaeta, Nixon ; Cartland-Glover, Gregory ; Heffernan, Sinead P. ; Byrne, Edmond P. ; Fitzpatrick, John J. / Breakage model development and application with CFD for predicting breakage of whey protein precipitate particles. In: Chemical Engineering Science. 2005 ; Vol. 60, No. 13. pp. 3443-3452.
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Breakage model development and application with CFD for predicting breakage of whey protein precipitate particles. / Zumaeta, Nixon; Cartland-Glover, Gregory; Heffernan, Sinead P.; Byrne, Edmond P.; Fitzpatrick, John J.

In: Chemical Engineering Science, Vol. 60, No. 13, 07.2005, p. 3443-3452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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