Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes

Rachel Royston, Chris Oliver, Jo Moss, Dawn Adams, Katie Berg, Patricia Howlin, Lisa Nelson, Cheryl Burbidge, Chris Stinton, Jane Waite

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader–Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were few group differences, although participants with Williams syndrome were more likely to show body stereotypies. Individuals with Williams syndrome also showed more hoarding and less tidying behaviours than those with Down syndrome. IQ and adaptive ability were negatively associated with repetitive questioning in people with Williams syndrome. The profile of repetitive behaviour amongst individuals with Williams syndrome was similar to the comparison syndromes. The cognitive mechanisms underlying these behaviours in genetic syndromes warrant further investigation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages326–331
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume48
Issue number1
Early online date4 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

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Williams Syndrome
Prader-Willi Syndrome
Down Syndrome
Aptitude
Caregivers
Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome type Preus

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Royston, Rachel ; Oliver, Chris ; Moss, Jo ; Adams, Dawn ; Berg, Katie ; Howlin, Patricia ; Nelson, Lisa ; Burbidge, Cheryl ; Stinton, Chris ; Waite, Jane. / Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 1. pp. 326–331.
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Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. / Royston, Rachel; Oliver, Chris ; Moss, Jo; Adams, Dawn; Berg, Katie; Howlin, Patricia; Nelson, Lisa; Burbidge, Cheryl; Stinton, Chris; Waite, Jane.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 326–331.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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AU - Royston, Rachel

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AU - Nelson, Lisa

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AU - Stinton, Chris

AU - Waite, Jane

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AB - This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader–Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were few group differences, although participants with Williams syndrome were more likely to show body stereotypies. Individuals with Williams syndrome also showed more hoarding and less tidying behaviours than those with Down syndrome. IQ and adaptive ability were negatively associated with repetitive questioning in people with Williams syndrome. The profile of repetitive behaviour amongst individuals with Williams syndrome was similar to the comparison syndromes. The cognitive mechanisms underlying these behaviours in genetic syndromes warrant further investigation.

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