But it’s not all about the sex: mothering, normalisation and young learning disabled people

Chrissie Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper is about mothering, young learning disabled people, their sexualised and relationship lives and normalisation - not through the lens of the disabled person, but via a mothers perspective and theoretical discussion. As a mother who has a learning disabled daughter, a feminist and an academic, my own mothering experience, my PhD research and social theory are woven throughout this paper with the intention of opening up debate about sex, intimacy, normalisation, and how this impacts upon young learning disabled people. I suggest that the relationship between sex, reproduction, intimacy and intellectual impairment, and a project to decipher what it means to be human, in all its dirty glory are also part of the discourse that needs to be discussed experientially and theoretically. So much so that the messy world within which we all live can be variously and differently constructed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-74
Number of pages12
JournalDisability and Society
Volume25
Issue number1
Early online date4 Jan 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

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normalization
Learning
intimacy
Mothers
learning
Disabled Persons
Nuclear Family
Lenses
Reproduction
human being
discourse
Research
experience

Keywords

  • intimacy
  • learning disability
  • sex
  • youth
  • normalisation
  • mothering

Cite this

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But it’s not all about the sex : mothering, normalisation and young learning disabled people. / Rogers, Chrissie.

In: Disability and Society, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 63-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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