Chinese host country nationals' willingness to help expatriates: the role of social categorization

Arup Varma, Pawan Budhwar*, Shaun Pichler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we examine Chinese host country nationals' (HCNs') willingness to offer role information and social support to expatriates from the United States. Using data from 132 Chinese managers, we find that ethnocentrism, interpersonal affect, and guanxi significantly impact HCNs' willingness to offer help to expatriates. Furthermore, we find that the job level of the expatriate has a significant impact on HCNs' willingness to offer role information but not on willingness to offer social support. The results suggest that paying attention to the perceptions and reactions of HCNs toward expatriates is imperative for multinational companies if expatriates are to succeed on their assignments. ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353–364
Number of pages12
JournalThunderbird International Business Review
Volume53
Issue number3
Early online date14 Apr 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

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social support
ethnocentrism
manager
Social categorization
Host country nationals
Expatriates
Willingness
Social support

Cite this

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Chinese host country nationals' willingness to help expatriates : the role of social categorization. / Varma, Arup; Budhwar, Pawan; Pichler, Shaun.

In: Thunderbird International Business Review, Vol. 53, No. 3, 05.2011, p. 353–364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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