Community accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages

Anne Burns, Mira Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports on a research project that investigated the accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages. This is a critical aspect of the mediation of intercultural and interlingual communication in the domain of public health information and yet very little research has been undertaken to address such issues. The project was carried out in collaboration with the New South Wales Multicultural Health Communication Service (MHCS), which provides advice and services to state-based health professionals aiming to communicate with non-English speaking communities.

The research employed a mixed-method and action research based approach involving two phases. The primary focus of this paper is to discuss major quantitative findings from the first pilot phase, which indicated that there is much room to improve the way in which health information is written in English for effective community-wide communication within a multilingual society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-75
Number of pages18
JournalTranslation and Interpreting
Volume3
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

health information
Language
communication
Health
language
Communication
Research
community
Health Communication
New South Wales
Health Services Research
action research
health professionals
Health Services
mediation
speaking
research project
Public Health
public health
health

Keywords

  • plain English
  • translation accessibility
  • community translation
  • public health information

Cite this

@article{e2c5c2bc721341d793f801f24d031e2e,
title = "Community accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages",
abstract = "This paper reports on a research project that investigated the accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages. This is a critical aspect of the mediation of intercultural and interlingual communication in the domain of public health information and yet very little research has been undertaken to address such issues. The project was carried out in collaboration with the New South Wales Multicultural Health Communication Service (MHCS), which provides advice and services to state-based health professionals aiming to communicate with non-English speaking communities.The research employed a mixed-method and action research based approach involving two phases. The primary focus of this paper is to discuss major quantitative findings from the first pilot phase, which indicated that there is much room to improve the way in which health information is written in English for effective community-wide communication within a multilingual society.",
keywords = "plain English, translation accessibility, community translation, public health information",
author = "Anne Burns and Mira Kim",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "58--75",
journal = "Translation and Interpreting",
issn = "1836-9324",
publisher = "School of Humanities and Communication Arts, University of Western Sydney",
number = "1",

}

Community accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages. / Burns, Anne; Kim, Mira.

In: Translation and Interpreting, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2011, p. 58-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Community accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages

AU - Burns, Anne

AU - Kim, Mira

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This paper reports on a research project that investigated the accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages. This is a critical aspect of the mediation of intercultural and interlingual communication in the domain of public health information and yet very little research has been undertaken to address such issues. The project was carried out in collaboration with the New South Wales Multicultural Health Communication Service (MHCS), which provides advice and services to state-based health professionals aiming to communicate with non-English speaking communities.The research employed a mixed-method and action research based approach involving two phases. The primary focus of this paper is to discuss major quantitative findings from the first pilot phase, which indicated that there is much room to improve the way in which health information is written in English for effective community-wide communication within a multilingual society.

AB - This paper reports on a research project that investigated the accessibility of health information and the consequent impact for translation into community languages. This is a critical aspect of the mediation of intercultural and interlingual communication in the domain of public health information and yet very little research has been undertaken to address such issues. The project was carried out in collaboration with the New South Wales Multicultural Health Communication Service (MHCS), which provides advice and services to state-based health professionals aiming to communicate with non-English speaking communities.The research employed a mixed-method and action research based approach involving two phases. The primary focus of this paper is to discuss major quantitative findings from the first pilot phase, which indicated that there is much room to improve the way in which health information is written in English for effective community-wide communication within a multilingual society.

KW - plain English

KW - translation accessibility

KW - community translation

KW - public health information

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859730687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 58

EP - 75

JO - Translation and Interpreting

JF - Translation and Interpreting

SN - 1836-9324

IS - 1

ER -