Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Objective - The objective of the research was to examine to what extent community pharmacists in Great Britain believed that their job was concerned with local public health issues.
Methods - The project (Pharmacy and Public Health)received ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University. After piloting, in August 2006 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to practicing community pharmacists in Great Britain (n=1998), with a follow-up to non-responders 4 weeks later. A final response rate of 51% (n=1023/1998) was achieved.
Results - Respondents were asked to indicate their answer to the question “to what extent is your present job concerned with local public health issues?” on a three-point scale – “highly”, “slightly” or “not at all” concerned with public health. They were also asked to indicate whether they were pharmacy owners, employee pharmacists or self-employed locum pharmacists. Less than half (43%,n=384/898) of respondents answering both questions believed that their job was highly concerned with public health. A relationship was observed between employment status and the level to which a respondent believed that their job was concerned with public health (chi-square test with P=0.001). Over half of pharmacy owners (51%, n=68/134) considered that their job was highly concerned with public health compared to44% (n=193/443) of employee pharmacists and38% (n=123/321) of locum pharmacists.
Conclusion - This research suggests that community pharmacists in Great Britain are not ‘fully engaged’ with public health. Pharmacy owners may feel more enfranchised in the public health movement than their employees and locums. Indeed, one-in-ten locums reported that their job was not at all concerned with public health which, as locum pharmacists constitute over a third of actively employed community pharmacists, could be limiting factor in any drive to strengthen the public health function of community pharmacists.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop - Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: 23 Aug 201026 Aug 2010

Conference

Conference16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop
Abbreviated titleISPW
CountryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period23/08/1026/08/10

Fingerprint

Pharmacists
Public Health
United Kingdom
School Health Services
Biological Science Disciplines
Research Ethics Committees
Chi-Square Distribution
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Bibliographical note

Abstract published in Pharmacy Practice, 8 (Suppl.1), p.90. ISSN 1886-3655.

Cite this

Bush, J., Langley, C. A., & Wilson, K. A. (2010). Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain. Abstract from 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, Lisbon, Portugal.
Bush, Joe ; Langley, Christopher A. ; Wilson, Keith A. / Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain. Abstract from 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, Lisbon, Portugal.
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title = "Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain",
abstract = "Objective - The objective of the research was to examine to what extent community pharmacists in Great Britain believed that their job was concerned with local public health issues. Methods - The project (Pharmacy and Public Health)received ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University. After piloting, in August 2006 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to practicing community pharmacists in Great Britain (n=1998), with a follow-up to non-responders 4 weeks later. A final response rate of 51{\%} (n=1023/1998) was achieved. Results - Respondents were asked to indicate their answer to the question “to what extent is your present job concerned with local public health issues?” on a three-point scale – “highly”, “slightly” or “not at all” concerned with public health. They were also asked to indicate whether they were pharmacy owners, employee pharmacists or self-employed locum pharmacists. Less than half (43{\%},n=384/898) of respondents answering both questions believed that their job was highly concerned with public health. A relationship was observed between employment status and the level to which a respondent believed that their job was concerned with public health (chi-square test with P=0.001). Over half of pharmacy owners (51{\%}, n=68/134) considered that their job was highly concerned with public health compared to44{\%} (n=193/443) of employee pharmacists and38{\%} (n=123/321) of locum pharmacists. Conclusion - This research suggests that community pharmacists in Great Britain are not ‘fully engaged’ with public health. Pharmacy owners may feel more enfranchised in the public health movement than their employees and locums. Indeed, one-in-ten locums reported that their job was not at all concerned with public health which, as locum pharmacists constitute over a third of actively employed community pharmacists, could be limiting factor in any drive to strengthen the public health function of community pharmacists.",
author = "Joe Bush and Langley, {Christopher A.} and Wilson, {Keith A.}",
note = "Abstract published in Pharmacy Practice, 8 (Suppl.1), p.90. ISSN 1886-3655.; 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, ISPW ; Conference date: 23-08-2010 Through 26-08-2010",
year = "2010",
language = "English",

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Bush, J, Langley, CA & Wilson, KA 2010, 'Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain' 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, Lisbon, Portugal, 23/08/10 - 26/08/10, .

Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain. / Bush, Joe; Langley, Christopher A.; Wilson, Keith A.

2010. Abstract from 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, Lisbon, Portugal.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain

AU - Bush, Joe

AU - Langley, Christopher A.

AU - Wilson, Keith A.

N1 - Abstract published in Pharmacy Practice, 8 (Suppl.1), p.90. ISSN 1886-3655.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Objective - The objective of the research was to examine to what extent community pharmacists in Great Britain believed that their job was concerned with local public health issues. Methods - The project (Pharmacy and Public Health)received ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University. After piloting, in August 2006 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to practicing community pharmacists in Great Britain (n=1998), with a follow-up to non-responders 4 weeks later. A final response rate of 51% (n=1023/1998) was achieved. Results - Respondents were asked to indicate their answer to the question “to what extent is your present job concerned with local public health issues?” on a three-point scale – “highly”, “slightly” or “not at all” concerned with public health. They were also asked to indicate whether they were pharmacy owners, employee pharmacists or self-employed locum pharmacists. Less than half (43%,n=384/898) of respondents answering both questions believed that their job was highly concerned with public health. A relationship was observed between employment status and the level to which a respondent believed that their job was concerned with public health (chi-square test with P=0.001). Over half of pharmacy owners (51%, n=68/134) considered that their job was highly concerned with public health compared to44% (n=193/443) of employee pharmacists and38% (n=123/321) of locum pharmacists. Conclusion - This research suggests that community pharmacists in Great Britain are not ‘fully engaged’ with public health. Pharmacy owners may feel more enfranchised in the public health movement than their employees and locums. Indeed, one-in-ten locums reported that their job was not at all concerned with public health which, as locum pharmacists constitute over a third of actively employed community pharmacists, could be limiting factor in any drive to strengthen the public health function of community pharmacists.

AB - Objective - The objective of the research was to examine to what extent community pharmacists in Great Britain believed that their job was concerned with local public health issues. Methods - The project (Pharmacy and Public Health)received ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University. After piloting, in August 2006 a self-completion postal questionnaire was sent to practicing community pharmacists in Great Britain (n=1998), with a follow-up to non-responders 4 weeks later. A final response rate of 51% (n=1023/1998) was achieved. Results - Respondents were asked to indicate their answer to the question “to what extent is your present job concerned with local public health issues?” on a three-point scale – “highly”, “slightly” or “not at all” concerned with public health. They were also asked to indicate whether they were pharmacy owners, employee pharmacists or self-employed locum pharmacists. Less than half (43%,n=384/898) of respondents answering both questions believed that their job was highly concerned with public health. A relationship was observed between employment status and the level to which a respondent believed that their job was concerned with public health (chi-square test with P=0.001). Over half of pharmacy owners (51%, n=68/134) considered that their job was highly concerned with public health compared to44% (n=193/443) of employee pharmacists and38% (n=123/321) of locum pharmacists. Conclusion - This research suggests that community pharmacists in Great Britain are not ‘fully engaged’ with public health. Pharmacy owners may feel more enfranchised in the public health movement than their employees and locums. Indeed, one-in-ten locums reported that their job was not at all concerned with public health which, as locum pharmacists constitute over a third of actively employed community pharmacists, could be limiting factor in any drive to strengthen the public health function of community pharmacists.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Bush J, Langley CA, Wilson KA. Community pharmacists' engagement with public health in Great Britain. 2010. Abstract from 16th International Social Pharmacy Workshop, Lisbon, Portugal.