Connecting a sociology of childhood perspective with the study of child health, illness and wellbeing: introduction

Geraldine Brady, Pam Lowe, Sonja Olin Lauritzen

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Abstract

In the last decades we have seen a growing interest in research into children's own experiences and understandings of health and illness. This development, we would argue, is much stimulated by the sociology of childhood which has drawn our attention to how children as a social group are placed and perceived within the structure of society, and within inter-generational relations, as well as how children are social agents and co-constructors of their social world. Drawing on this tradition, we here address some cross-cutting themes that we think are important to further the study of child health: situating children within health policy, drawing attention to practices around children's health and well-being and a focus on children as health actors. The paper contributes to a critical analysis of child health policy and notions of child health and normality, pointing to theoretical and empirical research potential for the sociology of children's health and illness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173-183
Number of pages11
JournalSociology of health and illness
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

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Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Brady, G., Lowe, P., & Olin Lauritzen, S. (2015). Connecting a sociology of childhood perspective with the study of child health, illness and wellbeing: introduction. Sociology of health and illness, 37(2), 173-183., which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9566.12260. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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