Creating gusto through games and goals

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Goal-based learning (GBL) has long been used for teaching (Schank and Kass, 1996) and training (Collins, 1994), and game playing is also very widely used (Fudenberg and Levine, 1998). When both are used together it can become a winning combination that focuses students? attention, dismisses precepts about a subject, lowers barriers to preferred learning-styles and open minds to new tools, ideas and concepts. The combination can be achieved using basic traditional physical props (e.g. pens and paper) or advanced internet technology. This report briefly describes an offline and online approach and then summarises some of the main benefits to be gained from combining games and goals to get students going in the right pedagogical direction.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGood practice guide in learning and teaching
EditorsJulie Green, Helen Higson
Place of PublicationBirmingham (UK)
PublisherAston University
Pages35-38
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)978-1-854494-56-6
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Publication series

NameGood practice guide in learning and teaching
PublisherAston University
Volume6

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learning
student
Internet
Teaching

Cite this

Clegg, B. (2009). Creating gusto through games and goals. In J. Green, & H. Higson (Eds.), Good practice guide in learning and teaching (pp. 35-38). (Good practice guide in learning and teaching; Vol. 6). Birmingham (UK): Aston University.
Clegg, Ben. / Creating gusto through games and goals. Good practice guide in learning and teaching. editor / Julie Green ; Helen Higson. Birmingham (UK) : Aston University, 2009. pp. 35-38 (Good practice guide in learning and teaching).
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Clegg, B 2009, Creating gusto through games and goals. in J Green & H Higson (eds), Good practice guide in learning and teaching. Good practice guide in learning and teaching, vol. 6, Aston University, Birmingham (UK), pp. 35-38.

Creating gusto through games and goals. / Clegg, Ben.

Good practice guide in learning and teaching. ed. / Julie Green; Helen Higson. Birmingham (UK) : Aston University, 2009. p. 35-38 (Good practice guide in learning and teaching; Vol. 6).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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SN - 978-1-854494-56-6

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Clegg B. Creating gusto through games and goals. In Green J, Higson H, editors, Good practice guide in learning and teaching. Birmingham (UK): Aston University. 2009. p. 35-38. (Good practice guide in learning and teaching).