Delivering phonological and phonics training within whole-class teaching

Laura R. Shapiro, Jonathan Solity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Early, intensive phonological awareness and phonics training is widely held to be beneficial for children with poor phonological awareness. However, most studies have delivered this training separately from children's normal whole-class reading lessons. Aims: We examined whether integrating this training into whole class, mixed-ability reading lessons could impact on children with poor phonological awareness, whilst also benefiting normally developing readers. Sample: Teachers delivered the training within a broad reading programme to whole classes of children from Reception to the end of Year 1 (N=251). A comparison group of children received standard teaching methods (N=213). Method: Children's literacy was assessed at the beginning of Reception, and then at the end of each year until 1 year post-intervention. Results: The strategy significantly impacted on reading performance for normally developing readers and those with poor phonological awareness, vastly reducing the incidence of reading difficulties from 20% in comparison schools to 5% in intervention schools. Conclusions: Phonological and phonics training is highly effective for children with poor phonological awareness, even when incorporated into whole-class teaching.
LanguageEnglish
Pages597-620
Number of pages24
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume78
Issue numberPart 4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

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Bibliographical note

Reproduced with permission from British journal of educational psychology © The British Psychological Society 2008.

Keywords

  • phonological awareness
  • phonics training
  • children
  • poor phonological awareness
  • class reading lessons.

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Early, intensive phonological awareness and phonics training is widely held to be beneficial for children with poor phonological awareness. However, most studies have delivered this training separately from children's normal whole-class reading lessons. Aims: We examined whether integrating this training into whole class, mixed-ability reading lessons could impact on children with poor phonological awareness, whilst also benefiting normally developing readers. Sample: Teachers delivered the training within a broad reading programme to whole classes of children from Reception to the end of Year 1 (N=251). A comparison group of children received standard teaching methods (N=213). Method: Children's literacy was assessed at the beginning of Reception, and then at the end of each year until 1 year post-intervention. Results: The strategy significantly impacted on reading performance for normally developing readers and those with poor phonological awareness, vastly reducing the incidence of reading difficulties from 20{\%} in comparison schools to 5{\%} in intervention schools. Conclusions: Phonological and phonics training is highly effective for children with poor phonological awareness, even when incorporated into whole-class teaching.",
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Delivering phonological and phonics training within whole-class teaching. / Shapiro, Laura R.; Solity, Jonathan.

In: British Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 78, No. Part 4, 12.2008, p. 597-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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