Development of reasoning: behavioral evidence to support reinforcement over cognitive control accounts

Julia R. Badger, Laura Shapiro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Speed's theory makes two predictions for the development of analogical reasoning. Firstly, young children should not be able to reason analogically due to an undeveloped PFC neural network. Secondly, category knowledge enables the reinforcement of structural features over surface features, and thus the development of sophisticated, analogical, reasoning. We outline existing studies that support these predictions and highlight some critical remaining issues. Specifically, we argue that the development of inhibition must be directly compared alongside the development of reasoning strategies in order to support Speed's account.
LanguageEnglish
Pages138-139
Number of pages2
JournalCognitive Neuroscience
Volume1
Issue number2
Early online date7 Jun 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Bibliographical note

This is an electronic version of an article published in Badger, J & Shapiro, L 2010, 'Development of reasoning: Behavioral evidence to support reinforcement over cognitive control accounts', Cognitive neuroscience, vol 1, no. 2, pp. 138-139. Cognitive neuroscience is available online at http://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1758-8928&volume=1&issue=2&spage=138

Cite this

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Development of reasoning : behavioral evidence to support reinforcement over cognitive control accounts. / Badger, Julia R.; Shapiro, Laura.

In: Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2010, p. 138-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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