Do left and right asymmetries of hemispheric preference interact with attention to predict local and global performance in applied tasks?

Chris J. Jackson, Elizabeth V. Hobman, Nerina L. Jimmieson, Robin Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Many cognitive neuroscience studies show that the ability to attend to and identify global or local information is lateralised between the two hemispheres in the human brain; the left hemisphere is biased towards the local level, whereas the right hemisphere is biased towards the global level. Results of two studies show attention-focused people with a right ear preference (biased towards the left hemisphere) are better at local tasks, whereas people with a left ear preference (biased towards the right hemisphere) are better at more global tasks. In a third study we determined if right hemisphere-biased followers who attend to global stimuli are likely to have a stronger relationship between attention and globally based supervisor ratings of performance. Results provide evidence in support of this hypothesis. Our research supports our model and suggests that the interaction between attention and lateral preference is an important and novel predictor of work-related outcomes. © 2012 Copyright Psychology Press Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)647-672
Number of pages26
JournalLaterality
Volume17
Issue number6
Early online date13 Jan 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • attention
  • hemispheric asymmetries
  • lateral preference
  • ear preference
  • global attentiveness
  • local attentiveness

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