Early career outcomes of graduate employees: the effects of mentoring and ingratiation

Samuel Aryee, T. Wyatt, R.J. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Underpinned by the growing recognition of influence processes or a careerist orientation in the determination of career success, this study examined the effect of career-oriented mentoring, ingratiation and their interaction term on the career success measures of salary, number of promotions received and career satisfaction. Data were obtained through structured questionnaires from graduate employees (N= 432) working full-time in Hong Kong. Results of the ordinary least-squares regression analyses revealed a non-significant effect of career-oriented mentoring, ingratiation and their interaction term on salary. Career-oriented mentoring was, however, significantly positively related to number of promotions received and career satisfaction. Although the results reinforced the dominance of the traditional determinants of career success, the significant effect of career-oriented mentoring on two of the career success measures may help to paint a more realistic picture of the process of career success in organizations. Limitations of the study, directions for future research and implications of the findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-118
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Management Studies
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1996

Keywords

  • research
  • career development
  • promotions
  • occupational achievement
  • regression analysis
  • personnel changes
  • vocational guidance
  • personnel management
  • incentives in industry
  • organizational behavior
  • employee motivation
  • management
  • strategic planning
  • mentoring
  • psychological aspects

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