Effects of syllabic complexity in predicting accuracy of repetition and direction of errors in patients with articulatory and phonological difficulties

Cristina Romani*, Claudia Galluzzi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the existence of a strong and significant effect of complexity in aphasia independent from other variables including length. Complexity was found to be a strong and significant predictor of accurate repetition in a group of 13 Italian aphasic patients when it was entered in a regression equation either simultaneously or after a large number of other variables. Significant effects were found both when complexity was measured in terms of number of complex onsets (as in a recent paper by Nickels & Howard, 2004) and when it was measured in a more comprehensive way. Significant complexity effects were also found with matched lists contrasting simple and complex words and in analyses of errors. Effects of complexity, however, were restricted to patients with articulatory difficulties. Reasons for this association and for the lack of significant results in Nickels and Howard (2004) are discussed. © 2005 Psychology Press Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)817-850
Number of pages34
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Bibliographical note

This is an electronic version of an article published in Romani, Cristina and Galluzzi, Claudia (2005). Effects of syllabic complexity in predicting accuracy of repetition and direction of errors in patients with articulatory and phonological difficulties. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 22 (7), pp. 817-850. Cognitive Neuropsychology is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0264-3294&volume=22&issue=7&spage=817

Keywords

  • complexity
  • aphasia
  • repetition
  • regression equation
  • complexity effects

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