‘Enemy Aliens’ in Scotland in a Global Context, 1914-1919: Germanophobia, Internment, Forgetting

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

After the outbreak of war, civilians of Central Power nationality were declared ‘enemy aliens’ throughout the British Empire. Scotland serves as a representative case history to analyse patterns of public Germanophobia, ethnic minority displacement, internment, and repatriation. The Stobs camp in the Scottish Borders region was one of the biggest camps in the Empire. Internees were affected by the depressive ‘barbed wire disease’ and organised a plethora of activities. Those who were repatriated faced destitution in Germany. Neither in Britain nor in Germany have they been included in remembrance cultures. Within wider debates about the totalisation of warfare during World War I, the article takes on a global perspective to argue in favour of a stronger emphasis on civilian suffering.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMinorities and the First World War. From War to Peace
EditorsHannah Ewence, Tim Grady
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages117
Number of pages142
ISBN (Print)978-1-137-53975-5
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘Enemy Aliens’ in Scotland in a Global Context, 1914-1919: Germanophobia, Internment, Forgetting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this