Enhancing employability in the "ME generation"

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to place all of the contributions to this special issue into a theoretical framework and to highlight the role that the so-called “information age mindset” has in the facilitation of employability skills.
Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the major themes of this special issue.
Findings – Undergraduate students do see the importance of technological innovation in the classroom but they see the development of experiential or work-based skills to be more important.
Practical implications – Future curriculum design should consider the expectations and attitudes of the modern day undergraduate student to ensure that potential employability is maximised.
Originality/value – The findings are placed into the wider context of the emerging field of evolutionary educational psychology.
LanguageEnglish
Pages445-449
Number of pages5
JournalEducation and Training
Volume52
Issue number6-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

employability
educational psychology
technical innovation
student
curriculum
classroom
methodology
Values
Undergraduate students
Employability
Facilitation
Technological innovation
Psychology
Design methodology
Curriculum design
Evolutionary
Mindset
Theoretical framework
Information age
Education

Keywords

  • mindsets
  • employment
  • skills
  • communication technologies
  • students
  • innovation

Cite this

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title = "Enhancing employability in the {"}ME generation{"}",
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Enhancing employability in the "ME generation". / Senior, Carl; Cubbidge, Robert.

In: Education and Training, Vol. 52, No. 6-7, 2010, p. 445-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cubbidge, Robert

PY - 2010

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AB - Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to place all of the contributions to this special issue into a theoretical framework and to highlight the role that the so-called “information age mindset” has in the facilitation of employability skills.Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the major themes of this special issue.Findings – Undergraduate students do see the importance of technological innovation in the classroom but they see the development of experiential or work-based skills to be more important.Practical implications – Future curriculum design should consider the expectations and attitudes of the modern day undergraduate student to ensure that potential employability is maximised.Originality/value – The findings are placed into the wider context of the emerging field of evolutionary educational psychology.

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