Entrepreneurship, social capital, and institutions: social and commercial entrepreneurship across nations

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We model and test the relationship between social and commercial entrepreneurship drawing on social capital theory. We propose that the country prevalence rate of social entrepreneurship is an indicator of constructible nation-level social capital and enhances the likelihood of individual commercial entry. We further posit that both social and commercial entrepreneurial entry is facilitated by certain formal institutions, namely strong property rights and (low) government activism, albeit the latter impacts each of these types of entrepreneurship differently. We apply bivariate discrete choice multilevel modeling to population-representative samples in 47 countries and find support for these hypotheses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)479-504
Number of pages26
JournalEntrepreneurship Theory and Practice
Volume37
Issue number3
Early online date22 Mar 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Estrin, S., Mickiewicz, T., & Stephan, U. (2013). Entrepreneurship, social capital, and institutions: social and commercial entrepreneurship across nations. Entrepreneurship theory and practice, 37(3), 479-504., which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/etap.12019. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving'.

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