Evaluating the use and impact of lecture recording in undergraduates: Evidence for distinct approaches by different groups of students

Wendy Leadbeater, Tom Shuttleworth, John Couperthwaite, Karl P. Nightingale*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lecture recordings are increasingly used to supplement lecture attendance within higher education, but their impact on student learning remains unclear. Here we describe a study to evaluate student use of lecture recordings and quantify their impact on academic performance. Questionnaire responses and online monitoring of student's access to recordings indicate that ∼75% students use this material, the majority in a targeted manner. In contrast, a small subset of students (∼5%) are highly dependent on recordings downloading every lecture, and viewing the material for long periods, such that this represents a large proportion of their independent study. This 'high user' group is atypical, as it contains a high proportion of dyslexic and Non-English Speaking Background students. Despite high usage, lecture recordings do not have a significant impact on academic performance, either across the cohort or with students that use the recordings. Overall, this approach appears to be beneficial, but may reduce lecture attendance and encourage surface learning approaches in a minority of students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalComputers and Education
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Action reasearch
  • Dyslexia
  • Evaluation of impact
  • Lecture recording

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