Extraction of Lead Ions and Partitioning Behaviour in Aqueous Biphasic Systems Based on Polyethylene Glycol and Different Salts

Kridsada Aunnankat, Ura Pancharoen, Worapon Kiatkittipong, Mali Hunsom, Farid Aiouache, Vesna Najdanovic*, Prakorn Ramakul

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Lead ions are environmental pollutants often present in very low concentrations, which makes them difficult to detect and, thus, present problems for environmental monitoring. In this study, we examined the performance of aqueous biphasic systems based on polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular mass of 4000 g mol–1) with ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4, magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), sodium sulfate (Na2SO4), and trisodium citrate (Na3C6H5O7) for the separation of lead(II) ions from aqueous solutions. We investigated the effects of salt types and the ratio of PEG4000 to salt on the extraction efficiency of lead(II) removal at constant temperatures of 303 K and 0.1 MPa. Additionally, we determined the cloud points (solubility equilibrium curve) and tie-lines for four ternary systems comprising PEG4000, water, and salt (either (NH4)2SO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, or Na3C6H5O7) under the same conditions. A maximum lead(II) extraction efficiency of 74.4% was achieved using the PEG4000/(NH4)2SO4 system with a mass fraction ratio of PEG4000 to (NH4)2SO4 of 0.2:0.12. This outcome highlights the significant potential of utilizing aqueous biphasic systems based on PEG4000 to separate lead(II) from aqueous solutions efficiently.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Chemical & Engineering Data
Early online date8 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Feb 2024

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2024 The Authors. Published by American Chemical Society. This publication is licensed under CC-BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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