Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction

Jacinto Santodomingo-Rubido*, César Villa-Collar, Bernard Gilmartin, Ramón Gutiérrez-Ortega

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine which baseline measurements constitute predictive factors for axial length growth over 2 years in children wearing orthokeratology contact lenses (OK) and single-vision spectacles (SV). METHODS: Sixty-one children were prospectively assigned to wear either OK (n = 31) or SV (n = 30) for 2 years. The primary outcome measure (dependent variable) was axial length change at 2 years relative to baseline. Other measurements (independent variables) were age, age of myopia onset, gender, myopia progression 2 years before baseline and baseline myopia, anterior chamber depth, corneal power and shape (p value), and iris and pupil diameters as well as parental refraction. The contribution of all independent variables to the 2-year change in axial length was assessed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: After univariate analyses, smaller increases in axial length were found in the OK group compared to the SV group in children who were older, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had less myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris diameter, had larger pupil sizes, and had lower levels of parental myopia (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, older age and greater corneal power were associated with smaller increases in axial length in the OK group (both p < 0.05), whereas in SV wearers, smaller iris diameter was associated with smaller increases in axial length (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Orthokeratology is a successful treatment option in controlling axial elongation compared to SV in children of older age, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had lower myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris and pupil diameters, and had lower levels of parental myopia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1225-1236
Number of pages12
JournalOptometry and Vision Science
Volume90
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

Myopia
Iris
Anterior Chamber
Pupil
Phosmet
Multivariate Analysis
Contact Lenses
Age of Onset
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • axial length
  • eye elongation
  • myopia control
  • myopia progression
  • myopigenic factors
  • orthokeratology

Cite this

Santodomingo-Rubido, Jacinto ; Villa-Collar, César ; Gilmartin, Bernard ; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Ramón. / Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction. In: Optometry and Vision Science. 2013 ; Vol. 90, No. 11. pp. 1225-1236.
@article{9847a69a4b5d426a9a2199451e7269ff,
title = "Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To examine which baseline measurements constitute predictive factors for axial length growth over 2 years in children wearing orthokeratology contact lenses (OK) and single-vision spectacles (SV). METHODS: Sixty-one children were prospectively assigned to wear either OK (n = 31) or SV (n = 30) for 2 years. The primary outcome measure (dependent variable) was axial length change at 2 years relative to baseline. Other measurements (independent variables) were age, age of myopia onset, gender, myopia progression 2 years before baseline and baseline myopia, anterior chamber depth, corneal power and shape (p value), and iris and pupil diameters as well as parental refraction. The contribution of all independent variables to the 2-year change in axial length was assessed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: After univariate analyses, smaller increases in axial length were found in the OK group compared to the SV group in children who were older, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had less myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris diameter, had larger pupil sizes, and had lower levels of parental myopia (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, older age and greater corneal power were associated with smaller increases in axial length in the OK group (both p < 0.05), whereas in SV wearers, smaller iris diameter was associated with smaller increases in axial length (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Orthokeratology is a successful treatment option in controlling axial elongation compared to SV in children of older age, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had lower myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris and pupil diameters, and had lower levels of parental myopia.",
keywords = "axial length, eye elongation, myopia control, myopia progression, myopigenic factors, orthokeratology",
author = "Jacinto Santodomingo-Rubido and C{\'e}sar Villa-Collar and Bernard Gilmartin and Ram{\'o}n Guti{\'e}rrez-Ortega",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1097/OPX.0000000000000034",
language = "English",
volume = "90",
pages = "1225--1236",
journal = "Optometry and Vision Science",
issn = "1040-5488",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "11",

}

Santodomingo-Rubido, J, Villa-Collar, C, Gilmartin, B & Gutiérrez-Ortega, R 2013, 'Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction', Optometry and Vision Science, vol. 90, no. 11, pp. 1225-1236. https://doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0000000000000034

Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction. / Santodomingo-Rubido, Jacinto; Villa-Collar, César; Gilmartin, Bernard; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Ramón.

In: Optometry and Vision Science, Vol. 90, No. 11, 11.2013, p. 1225-1236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors preventing myopia progression with orthokeratology correction

AU - Santodomingo-Rubido, Jacinto

AU - Villa-Collar, César

AU - Gilmartin, Bernard

AU - Gutiérrez-Ortega, Ramón

PY - 2013/11

Y1 - 2013/11

N2 - PURPOSE: To examine which baseline measurements constitute predictive factors for axial length growth over 2 years in children wearing orthokeratology contact lenses (OK) and single-vision spectacles (SV). METHODS: Sixty-one children were prospectively assigned to wear either OK (n = 31) or SV (n = 30) for 2 years. The primary outcome measure (dependent variable) was axial length change at 2 years relative to baseline. Other measurements (independent variables) were age, age of myopia onset, gender, myopia progression 2 years before baseline and baseline myopia, anterior chamber depth, corneal power and shape (p value), and iris and pupil diameters as well as parental refraction. The contribution of all independent variables to the 2-year change in axial length was assessed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: After univariate analyses, smaller increases in axial length were found in the OK group compared to the SV group in children who were older, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had less myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris diameter, had larger pupil sizes, and had lower levels of parental myopia (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, older age and greater corneal power were associated with smaller increases in axial length in the OK group (both p < 0.05), whereas in SV wearers, smaller iris diameter was associated with smaller increases in axial length (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Orthokeratology is a successful treatment option in controlling axial elongation compared to SV in children of older age, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had lower myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris and pupil diameters, and had lower levels of parental myopia.

AB - PURPOSE: To examine which baseline measurements constitute predictive factors for axial length growth over 2 years in children wearing orthokeratology contact lenses (OK) and single-vision spectacles (SV). METHODS: Sixty-one children were prospectively assigned to wear either OK (n = 31) or SV (n = 30) for 2 years. The primary outcome measure (dependent variable) was axial length change at 2 years relative to baseline. Other measurements (independent variables) were age, age of myopia onset, gender, myopia progression 2 years before baseline and baseline myopia, anterior chamber depth, corneal power and shape (p value), and iris and pupil diameters as well as parental refraction. The contribution of all independent variables to the 2-year change in axial length was assessed using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: After univariate analyses, smaller increases in axial length were found in the OK group compared to the SV group in children who were older, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had less myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris diameter, had larger pupil sizes, and had lower levels of parental myopia (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analyses, older age and greater corneal power were associated with smaller increases in axial length in the OK group (both p < 0.05), whereas in SV wearers, smaller iris diameter was associated with smaller increases in axial length (p = 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Orthokeratology is a successful treatment option in controlling axial elongation compared to SV in children of older age, had earlier onset of myopia, were female, had lower rate of myopia progression before baseline, had lower myopia at baseline, had longer anterior chamber depth, had greater corneal power, had more prolate corneal shape, had larger iris and pupil diameters, and had lower levels of parental myopia.

KW - axial length

KW - eye elongation

KW - myopia control

KW - myopia progression

KW - myopigenic factors

KW - orthokeratology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887408200&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://journals.lww.com/optvissci/Abstract/2013/11000/Factors_Preventing_Myopia_Progression_with.12.aspx

U2 - 10.1097/OPX.0000000000000034

DO - 10.1097/OPX.0000000000000034

M3 - Article

C2 - 24037063

AN - SCOPUS:84887408200

VL - 90

SP - 1225

EP - 1236

JO - Optometry and Vision Science

JF - Optometry and Vision Science

SN - 1040-5488

IS - 11

ER -