Foundations of an intervention package to improve communication in residential care settings: a mixed methods study

Helen Pryce*, Rachael Gooberman-Hill

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of hearing loss is considerably higher in individuals in residential care than in people within the community-dwelling population, and yet hearing aids and hearing services are relatively underused. Care staff have a key role in supporting access to services.

Objectives: This study identifies staff perspectives on hearing loss and their views about potential hearing service improvements.

Study design: A four-stage mixed methods study was used, made up of qualitative interviews, observation, a survey and a stakeholder involvement meeting. Results: The qualitative stages indicated that staff were concerned about their levels of interaction with residents. Staff considered maximizing communication as part of their professional role. The quantitative survey indicated that these views were widely held by staff, and the stakeholder stage identified the need for social support and dedicated staff training opportunities.

Conclusion: Care home staff regard communication as a shared issue. Future interventions could enhance access to hearing services and provide care home staff with training in hearing loss and hearing aid management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-38
Number of pages9
JournalHearing, Balance and Communication
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • care staff
  • communication
  • elderly
  • hearing loss
  • older people

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