From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider): a case study from Ireland

John Mee, Edward Sweeney

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Increased competition, geographically expanded marketplaces, technology replication and an ever discerning consumer base, are reasons why companies need to regularly reappraise their competencies in terms of activities and functions they perform themselves. Where viable alternatives exist, companies should consider outsourcing of non-core activities and functions.
Within SCM (Supply Chain Management) it could be preferable if a “one stop shop” existed for companies seeking to outsource functions identified as non-core. “Traditionally” structured LSP’s who have concentrated their service offer around providing warehousing and transport activities are potentially at a crossroads – clients and potential clients requiring “new” services which could increase LSP’s revenues if provided, whilst failure to provide could perhaps result in clients seeking outsourced services elsewhere.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network
EditorsEdward Sweeney, John Mee, Brian Fynes, Pietro Evangelista, Bernd Huber
Pages391-397
Number of pages7
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Event9th Annual Conference of the Logistics Research Network - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 8 Sep 200410 Sep 2004

Conference

Conference9th Annual Conference of the Logistics Research Network
Abbreviated titleLRN 2004
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period8/09/0410/09/04

Fingerprint

Ireland
Third-party logistics
Logistics service providers
Supply chain management
New services
Replication
Outsourcing
Warehousing
Competency
Revenue

Keywords

  • outsourcing
  • fourth party logistics
  • value chain logistics

Cite this

Mee, J., & Sweeney, E. (2004). From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider): a case study from Ireland. In E. Sweeney, J. Mee, B. Fynes, P. Evangelista, & B. Huber (Eds.), Enhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation: proceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network (pp. 391-397)
Mee, John ; Sweeney, Edward. / From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider) : a case study from Ireland. Enhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation: proceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network. editor / Edward Sweeney ; John Mee ; Brian Fynes ; Pietro Evangelista ; Bernd Huber. 2004. pp. 391-397
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abstract = "Increased competition, geographically expanded marketplaces, technology replication and an ever discerning consumer base, are reasons why companies need to regularly reappraise their competencies in terms of activities and functions they perform themselves. Where viable alternatives exist, companies should consider outsourcing of non-core activities and functions. Within SCM (Supply Chain Management) it could be preferable if a “one stop shop” existed for companies seeking to outsource functions identified as non-core. “Traditionally” structured LSP’s who have concentrated their service offer around providing warehousing and transport activities are potentially at a crossroads – clients and potential clients requiring “new” services which could increase LSP’s revenues if provided, whilst failure to provide could perhaps result in clients seeking outsourced services elsewhere.",
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Mee, J & Sweeney, E 2004, From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider): a case study from Ireland. in E Sweeney, J Mee, B Fynes, P Evangelista & B Huber (eds), Enhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation: proceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network. pp. 391-397, 9th Annual Conference of the Logistics Research Network, Dublin, Ireland, 8/09/04.

From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider) : a case study from Ireland. / Mee, John; Sweeney, Edward.

Enhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation: proceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network. ed. / Edward Sweeney; John Mee; Brian Fynes; Pietro Evangelista; Bernd Huber. 2004. p. 391-397.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - Increased competition, geographically expanded marketplaces, technology replication and an ever discerning consumer base, are reasons why companies need to regularly reappraise their competencies in terms of activities and functions they perform themselves. Where viable alternatives exist, companies should consider outsourcing of non-core activities and functions. Within SCM (Supply Chain Management) it could be preferable if a “one stop shop” existed for companies seeking to outsource functions identified as non-core. “Traditionally” structured LSP’s who have concentrated their service offer around providing warehousing and transport activities are potentially at a crossroads – clients and potential clients requiring “new” services which could increase LSP’s revenues if provided, whilst failure to provide could perhaps result in clients seeking outsourced services elsewhere.

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KW - value chain logistics

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Mee J, Sweeney E. From 3LSP (Third Party Logistics Service Provider) to 4LSP (Fourth Party Logistics Service Provider): a case study from Ireland. In Sweeney E, Mee J, Fynes B, Evangelista P, Huber B, editors, Enhancing competitive advantage through supply chain innovation: proceedings of the 9th annual conference of the Logistics Research Network. 2004. p. 391-397