Getting the most out of multidisciplinary teams: a multi-sample study of team innovation in health care

Doris Fay, Carol S. Borrill, Ziv Amir, Robert Haward, Michael A. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Driven by the assumption that multidisciplinarity contributes positively to team outcomes teams are often deliberately staffed such that they comprise multiple disciplines. However, the diversity literature suggests that multidisciplinarity may not always benefit a team. This study departs from the notion of a linear, positive effect of multidisciplinarity and tests its contingency on the quality of team processes. It was assumed that multidisciplinarity only contributes to team outcomes if the quality of team processes is high. This hypothesis was tested in two independent samples of health care workers (N = 66 and N = 95 teams), using team innovation as the outcome variable. Results support the hypothesis for the quality of innovation, rather than the number of innovations introduced by the teams.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)553-567
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

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Delivery of Health Care
Innovation
Healthcare
Multidisciplinary team
Multidisciplinarity

Keywords

  • multidisciplinarity
  • team outcomes

Cite this

Fay, Doris ; Borrill, Carol S. ; Amir, Ziv ; Haward, Robert ; West, Michael A. / Getting the most out of multidisciplinary teams: a multi-sample study of team innovation in health care. In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 79, No. 4. pp. 553-567.
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Getting the most out of multidisciplinary teams: a multi-sample study of team innovation in health care. / Fay, Doris; Borrill, Carol S.; Amir, Ziv; Haward, Robert; West, Michael A.

In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 79, No. 4, 12.2006, p. 553-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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