Homology modeling of GPCRs.

John Simms, Nathan E. Hall, Polo H.C. Lam, Laurence J. Miller, Arthur Christopoulos, Ruben Abagyan, Patrick M. Sexton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over 1,000 sequences likely to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are currently available in publicly accessible and proprietary databases and this number may grow with the refinement of a number of different genomes. However, despite recent efforts in the crystallization of these proteins, homology modeling approaches are becoming widely used as a method for obtaining quantitative and qualitative information for structure-based drug design as well as the interpretation of experimental data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-113
Number of pages17
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume552
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2009

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Drug Design
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Crystallization
Genome
Databases
Proteins

Cite this

Simms, J., Hall, N. E., Lam, P. H. C., Miller, L. J., Christopoulos, A., Abagyan, R., & Sexton, P. M. (2009). Homology modeling of GPCRs. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), 552, 97-113. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-317-6_7
Simms, John ; Hall, Nathan E. ; Lam, Polo H.C. ; Miller, Laurence J. ; Christopoulos, Arthur ; Abagyan, Ruben ; Sexton, Patrick M. / Homology modeling of GPCRs. In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2009 ; Vol. 552. pp. 97-113.
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Simms, J, Hall, NE, Lam, PHC, Miller, LJ, Christopoulos, A, Abagyan, R & Sexton, PM 2009, 'Homology modeling of GPCRs.', Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 552, pp. 97-113. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-317-6_7

Homology modeling of GPCRs. / Simms, John; Hall, Nathan E.; Lam, Polo H.C.; Miller, Laurence J.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Abagyan, Ruben; Sexton, Patrick M.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 552, 01.01.2009, p. 97-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Simms J, Hall NE, Lam PHC, Miller LJ, Christopoulos A, Abagyan R et al. Homology modeling of GPCRs. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2009 Jan 1;552:97-113. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-317-6_7