How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?

Helen Wharton, Jonathan Gibson, Paul Dodson

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Introduction: Macular oedema is not directly visible on digital photographs used in screening. Photographic surrogate markers are used to detect patients who may have macular oedema. Evidence suggests that only around 10% of patients with these surrogate markers referred to an ophthalmologist have macular oedema when examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy.
Purpose: The purpose of this audit was to determine how many patients with surrogate markers were truly identified by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as having macular oedema.
Method: Data were collected from patients attending digital diabetic retinopathy screening. Patients who presented with surrogate markers for macular oedema also had an OCT scan. The fast macula scan on the Stratus OCT was used and an ophthalmologist reviewed the scans to determine whether macular oedema was present.
Results: Out of 66 patients with maculopathy defined as haemorrhages or microaneurysms within one optic disc diameter (DD) of the fovea and visual acuity (VA) worse than 6/9 11 (17%) showed thickening on the OCT, only 4 (6%) had macular oedema. None required laser. Out of 155 patients with maculopathy defined as any exudate within one DD of the fovea or circinate within two DD 45 (29%) showed thickening on the OCT of these 27% required laser.
Conclusion: OCT is a useful tool in screening to help identify those who need a true referral to ophthalmology for maculopathy. If exudate is present the chance of having macular oedema and requiring laser treatment is greater than the presence of microaneurysms within one DD and reduced VA.
Original languageEnglish
Pages105
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventRoyal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011 - Birmingham, United Kingdom
Duration: 24 May 201126 May 2011

Conference

ConferenceRoyal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period24/05/1126/05/11

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Macular Edema
Optical Coherence Tomography
Biomarkers
Lasers
Exudates and Transudates
Visual Acuity
Optic Disk
Diabetic Retinopathy
Ophthalmology
Referral and Consultation
Hemorrhage

Cite this

Wharton, H., Gibson, J., & Dodson, P. (2011). How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?. 105. Abstract from Royal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Wharton, Helen ; Gibson, Jonathan ; Dodson, Paul. / How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?. Abstract from Royal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011, Birmingham, United Kingdom.1 p.
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abstract = "Introduction: Macular oedema is not directly visible on digital photographs used in screening. Photographic surrogate markers are used to detect patients who may have macular oedema. Evidence suggests that only around 10{\%} of patients with these surrogate markers referred to an ophthalmologist have macular oedema when examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy.Purpose: The purpose of this audit was to determine how many patients with surrogate markers were truly identified by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as having macular oedema.Method: Data were collected from patients attending digital diabetic retinopathy screening. Patients who presented with surrogate markers for macular oedema also had an OCT scan. The fast macula scan on the Stratus OCT was used and an ophthalmologist reviewed the scans to determine whether macular oedema was present.Results: Out of 66 patients with maculopathy defined as haemorrhages or microaneurysms within one optic disc diameter (DD) of the fovea and visual acuity (VA) worse than 6/9 11 (17{\%}) showed thickening on the OCT, only 4 (6{\%}) had macular oedema. None required laser. Out of 155 patients with maculopathy defined as any exudate within one DD of the fovea or circinate within two DD 45 (29{\%}) showed thickening on the OCT of these 27{\%} required laser.Conclusion: OCT is a useful tool in screening to help identify those who need a true referral to ophthalmology for maculopathy. If exudate is present the chance of having macular oedema and requiring laser treatment is greater than the presence of microaneurysms within one DD and reduced VA.",
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Wharton, H, Gibson, J & Dodson, P 2011, 'How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?' Royal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 24/05/11 - 26/05/11, pp. 105.

How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme? / Wharton, Helen; Gibson, Jonathan; Dodson, Paul.

2011. 105 Abstract from Royal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

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T1 - How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?

AU - Wharton, Helen

AU - Gibson, Jonathan

AU - Dodson, Paul

PY - 2011

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N2 - Introduction: Macular oedema is not directly visible on digital photographs used in screening. Photographic surrogate markers are used to detect patients who may have macular oedema. Evidence suggests that only around 10% of patients with these surrogate markers referred to an ophthalmologist have macular oedema when examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy.Purpose: The purpose of this audit was to determine how many patients with surrogate markers were truly identified by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as having macular oedema.Method: Data were collected from patients attending digital diabetic retinopathy screening. Patients who presented with surrogate markers for macular oedema also had an OCT scan. The fast macula scan on the Stratus OCT was used and an ophthalmologist reviewed the scans to determine whether macular oedema was present.Results: Out of 66 patients with maculopathy defined as haemorrhages or microaneurysms within one optic disc diameter (DD) of the fovea and visual acuity (VA) worse than 6/9 11 (17%) showed thickening on the OCT, only 4 (6%) had macular oedema. None required laser. Out of 155 patients with maculopathy defined as any exudate within one DD of the fovea or circinate within two DD 45 (29%) showed thickening on the OCT of these 27% required laser.Conclusion: OCT is a useful tool in screening to help identify those who need a true referral to ophthalmology for maculopathy. If exudate is present the chance of having macular oedema and requiring laser treatment is greater than the presence of microaneurysms within one DD and reduced VA.

AB - Introduction: Macular oedema is not directly visible on digital photographs used in screening. Photographic surrogate markers are used to detect patients who may have macular oedema. Evidence suggests that only around 10% of patients with these surrogate markers referred to an ophthalmologist have macular oedema when examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy.Purpose: The purpose of this audit was to determine how many patients with surrogate markers were truly identified by optical coherence tomography (OCT) as having macular oedema.Method: Data were collected from patients attending digital diabetic retinopathy screening. Patients who presented with surrogate markers for macular oedema also had an OCT scan. The fast macula scan on the Stratus OCT was used and an ophthalmologist reviewed the scans to determine whether macular oedema was present.Results: Out of 66 patients with maculopathy defined as haemorrhages or microaneurysms within one optic disc diameter (DD) of the fovea and visual acuity (VA) worse than 6/9 11 (17%) showed thickening on the OCT, only 4 (6%) had macular oedema. None required laser. Out of 155 patients with maculopathy defined as any exudate within one DD of the fovea or circinate within two DD 45 (29%) showed thickening on the OCT of these 27% required laser.Conclusion: OCT is a useful tool in screening to help identify those who need a true referral to ophthalmology for maculopathy. If exudate is present the chance of having macular oedema and requiring laser treatment is greater than the presence of microaneurysms within one DD and reduced VA.

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Wharton H, Gibson J, Dodson P. How accurate are photographic surrogate markers used to detect macular oedema in the english national Screening Programme?. 2011. Abstract from Royal College of Ophthalmologists Annual Congress 2011, Birmingham, United Kingdom.