How caching queries at client-peers affects the loads of super-peer P2P systems

Rozlina Mohamed*, Christopher D. Buckingham

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference publication

Abstract

Super-peer P2P systems strike a balance between searching efficiency in centralized P2P systems and the autonomy, load balancing and robustness provided by pure P2P systems. Super-peer is a node in the superpeer P2P system that maintains the central index for the information shared by a set of peers within the same cluster. The central index handles the searching request on behalf of the connecting set of peers and also passes on the request to neighboring super-peers in order to access additional indices and peers. In this paper, we study the behavior of query answering in super-peer P2P systems with the aim of understanding the issues and tradeoffs in designing a scalable superpeer system. We focus on where to post queries in order to retrieve the result and investigate the implications for four different architectures: caching queries and caching query results at the super-peer; caching the data location of previous queries; and an ordinary P2P system without any caching facilities. The paper discusses the tradeoffs parameters between architectures with respect to caching, highlights the effect of key parameter on system performance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Applications, ICPCA08
Pages875-881
Number of pages7
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2008
Event2008 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Applications, ICPCA08 - Alexandria, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Oct 20088 Oct 2008

Conference

Conference2008 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Applications, ICPCA08
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityAlexandria
Period6/10/088/10/08

Keywords

  • Peer-to-peer
  • Query answering
  • Query routing
  • Super-peer network

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