How do older people with sight loss manage their general health? A qualitative study

Amy E. Burton, Jonathan M. Gibson, Rachel L. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Older people with sight loss experience a number of barriers to managing their health. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how older people with sight loss manage their general health and explore the techniques used and strategies employed for health management.

Methods: Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 participants. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis.

Results: Health management challenges experienced included: managing multiple health conditions; accessing information; engaging in health behaviours and maintaining wellbeing. Positive strategies included: joining support groups, clubs and societies; using low vision aids; seeking support from family and friends and accessing support through health and social care services.

Conclusion: Healthcare professionals need to be more aware of the challenges faced by older people with sight loss. Improved promotion of group support and charity services which are best placed to share information, provide fora to learn about coping techniques and strategies, and give older people social support to prevent isolation is needed. Rehabilitation and support services and equipment can only be beneficial if patients know what is available and how to access them. Over-reliance on self-advocacy in current healthcare systems is not conducive to patient-centred care. Implications for Rehabilitation Sight loss in older people can impact on many factors including health management. This study identifies challenges to health management and highlights strategies used by older people with sight loss to manage their health. Access to support often relies on patients seeking information for themselves. However, self-advocacy is challenging due to information accessibility barriers. Informal groups and charities play an important role in educating patients about their condition and advising on available support to facilitate health management.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
VolumeLatest article
Early online date14 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Jan 2016

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Health
Charities
Delivery of Health Care
Rehabilitation
Interviews
Low Vision
Patient-Centered Care
Self-Help Groups
Health Behavior
Social Work
Social Support
Equipment and Supplies

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Disability and Rehabilitation on 14/01/16, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.3109/09638288.2015.1123310

Cite this

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How do older people with sight loss manage their general health? A qualitative study. / Burton, Amy E.; Gibson, Jonathan M.; Shaw, Rachel L.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation, Vol. Latest article, 14.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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