How organizational cultures shape social cognition for newcomer voices

Jinyun Duan, Xiaoshuang Lin, Xiaotian Wang, Yue Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on cue consensus theory and status characteristics theory, we argue that the consensus between newcomer voice (challenging vs. supportive) and organizational culture (individualistic vs. collectivistic) leads to observers' social cognition of warmth or competence. Based on two survey studies and two experiment studies, we found that individualistic organizational culture strengthens the positive relationship between challenging voice and perceived competence and that voice constructiveness mediates this moderating effect. We also found that collectivistic organizational culture strengthens the positive relationship between supportive voice and perceived warmth, and prosocial motivation mediates this moderating effect. Focusing on consistent cues between voice and organizational culture, our research contributes to the voice literature, answering when and how both newcomer challenging voice and supportive voice can lead to perceived warmth and competence. Our results offer both theoretical implications and practical insights for employees and organizations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Early online date4 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 May 2022

Keywords

  • newcomer voice
  • organizational cultures
  • social cognition of ‘big two’

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