Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods

Irini A. Doytchinova, Pingping Guan, Darren R. Flower

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Classification of MHC molecules into supertypes in terms of peptide-binding specificities is an important issue, with direct implications for the development of epitope-based vaccines with wide population coverage. In view of extremely high MHC polymorphism (948 class I and 633 class II HLA alleles) the experimental solution of this task is presently impossible. In this study, we describe a bioinformatics strategy for classifying MHC molecules into supertypes using information drawn solely from three-dimensional protein structure. Two chemometric techniques–hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis–were used independently on a set of 783 HLA class I molecules to identify supertypes based on structural similarities and molecular interaction fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77. action fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4314-4323
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume172
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Dermatoglyphics
Computational Biology
varespladib methyl
Alleles
Peptides
Binding Sites
Cluster Analysis
Epitopes
Vaccines
Population
Proteins

Cite this

Doytchinova, Irini A. ; Guan, Pingping ; Flower, Darren R. / Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods. In: Journal of Immunology. 2004 ; Vol. 172, No. 7. pp. 4314-4323.
@article{2b180c212c1549f98798d94ad1a6cd6e,
title = "Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods",
abstract = "Classification of MHC molecules into supertypes in terms of peptide-binding specificities is an important issue, with direct implications for the development of epitope-based vaccines with wide population coverage. In view of extremely high MHC polymorphism (948 class I and 633 class II HLA alleles) the experimental solution of this task is presently impossible. In this study, we describe a bioinformatics strategy for classifying MHC molecules into supertypes using information drawn solely from three-dimensional protein structure. Two chemometric techniques–hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis–were used independently on a set of 783 HLA class I molecules to identify supertypes based on structural similarities and molecular interaction fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77{\%} consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77. action fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77{\%} consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77.",
author = "Doytchinova, {Irini A.} and Pingping Guan and Flower, {Darren R.}",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4049/jimmunol.172.7.4314",
language = "English",
volume = "172",
pages = "4314--4323",
journal = "Journal of Immunology",
issn = "0022-1767",
publisher = "American Association of Immunologists",
number = "7",

}

Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods. / Doytchinova, Irini A.; Guan, Pingping; Flower, Darren R.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 172, No. 7, 01.04.2004, p. 4314-4323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifiying human MHC supertypes using bioinformatic methods

AU - Doytchinova, Irini A.

AU - Guan, Pingping

AU - Flower, Darren R.

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - Classification of MHC molecules into supertypes in terms of peptide-binding specificities is an important issue, with direct implications for the development of epitope-based vaccines with wide population coverage. In view of extremely high MHC polymorphism (948 class I and 633 class II HLA alleles) the experimental solution of this task is presently impossible. In this study, we describe a bioinformatics strategy for classifying MHC molecules into supertypes using information drawn solely from three-dimensional protein structure. Two chemometric techniques–hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis–were used independently on a set of 783 HLA class I molecules to identify supertypes based on structural similarities and molecular interaction fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77. action fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77.

AB - Classification of MHC molecules into supertypes in terms of peptide-binding specificities is an important issue, with direct implications for the development of epitope-based vaccines with wide population coverage. In view of extremely high MHC polymorphism (948 class I and 633 class II HLA alleles) the experimental solution of this task is presently impossible. In this study, we describe a bioinformatics strategy for classifying MHC molecules into supertypes using information drawn solely from three-dimensional protein structure. Two chemometric techniques–hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis–were used independently on a set of 783 HLA class I molecules to identify supertypes based on structural similarities and molecular interaction fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77. action fields calculated for the peptide binding site. Eight supertypes were defined: A2, A3, A24, B7, B27, B44, C1, and C4. The two techniques gave 77% consensus, i.e., 605 HLA class I alleles were classified in the same supertype by both methods. The proposed strategy allowed “supertype fingerprints” to be identified. Thus, the A2 supertype fingerprint is Tyr9/Phe9, Arg97, and His114 or Tyr116; the A3-Tyr9/Phe9/Ser9, Ile97/Met97 and Glu114 or Asp116; the A24-Ser9 and Met97; the B7-Asn63 and Leu81; the B27-Glu63 and Leu81; for B44-Ala81; the C1-Ser77; and the C4-Asn77.

UR - http://www.jimmunol.org/content/172/7/4314

U2 - 10.4049/jimmunol.172.7.4314

DO - 10.4049/jimmunol.172.7.4314

M3 - Article

VL - 172

SP - 4314

EP - 4323

JO - Journal of Immunology

JF - Journal of Immunology

SN - 0022-1767

IS - 7

ER -