Implicating trust in the innovation process

Chris Clegg, Kerrie Unsworth, Olga Epitropaki, Giselle Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the development of two new measures of innovation trust, ‘trust that heard’ and ‘trust that benefit’. We report the findings from their use in a survey of design engineers in two large aerospace companies. We test a range of hypotheses covering different plausible roles for trust and confirm a ‘main effects’ model, whereby the variables predict the number of ideas suggested and the number of ideas implemented. In addition, we replicate earlier findings by Axtel et al. (2000), namely that personal and job variables predict idea suggestion, whereas organizational variables predict implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-422
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2002

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Innovation process
Innovation
Engineers
Aerospace
Organizational variables
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • measures of innovation trust
  • design engineers
  • aerospace companies
  • trust
  • ideas suggested
  • ideas implemented
  • personal variables
  • job variables
  • idea suggestion
  • organizational variables
  • implementation

Cite this

Clegg, Chris ; Unsworth, Kerrie ; Epitropaki, Olga ; Parker, Giselle. / Implicating trust in the innovation process. In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 2002 ; Vol. 75, No. 4. pp. 409-422.
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Implicating trust in the innovation process. / Clegg, Chris; Unsworth, Kerrie; Epitropaki, Olga; Parker, Giselle.

In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 75, No. 4, 12.2002, p. 409-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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