Improving follow-up rates in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting: effectiveness of a targeted letter used by a regional centre in the UK

Christopher Anton, Anthony R. Cox, Robin E. Ferner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Spontaneous reports of suspected adverse drug reactions to regulatory bodies and market authorization holders are important in pharmacovigilance. Follow-up information, which can be difficult to obtain, is often required from reporters; therefore, we developed targeted follow-up letters that we hoped would make replying easier. Objective: To examine the effects of introducing targeted letters on responses to follow-up requests from a regional pharmacovigilance centre in the UK. Method: In January 2001 we redesigned our follow-up request letter to include tick-boxes targeted to obtain the appropriate information from reporters. Response rates and the requirement for a second follow-up letter were examined for the 5-year period before introduction of the targeted follow-up letter (1996-2000) and the 5 years after the change to the targeted follow-up system (2001-5). In an 18-month sub-study examining data from 2001-2, time from the production of the first targeted follow-up letter to receipt of a response from reporters was also measured. Results: The introduction of targeted follow-up letters was associated with an increase in the mean annual response rate for follow-up from 36.4% in the 5 years pre-targeted follow-up to 60.5% in the 5 years post-targeted follow-up (p < 0.0001). Fifty percent of all successful follow-up responses were obtained within 70 days. Conclusion: Targeted follow-up letters were associated with increased followup success rates. Results also indicate that closing cases to follow-up information at 70 days would allow collection of 78% of all follow-up that would ever arrive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1135-1140
Number of pages6
JournalDrug Safety
Volume32
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2009

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Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
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Anton, Christopher ; Cox, Anthony R. ; Ferner, Robin E. / Improving follow-up rates in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting : effectiveness of a targeted letter used by a regional centre in the UK. In: Drug Safety. 2009 ; Vol. 32, No. 12. pp. 1135-1140.
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abstract = "Background: Spontaneous reports of suspected adverse drug reactions to regulatory bodies and market authorization holders are important in pharmacovigilance. Follow-up information, which can be difficult to obtain, is often required from reporters; therefore, we developed targeted follow-up letters that we hoped would make replying easier. Objective: To examine the effects of introducing targeted letters on responses to follow-up requests from a regional pharmacovigilance centre in the UK. Method: In January 2001 we redesigned our follow-up request letter to include tick-boxes targeted to obtain the appropriate information from reporters. Response rates and the requirement for a second follow-up letter were examined for the 5-year period before introduction of the targeted follow-up letter (1996-2000) and the 5 years after the change to the targeted follow-up system (2001-5). In an 18-month sub-study examining data from 2001-2, time from the production of the first targeted follow-up letter to receipt of a response from reporters was also measured. Results: The introduction of targeted follow-up letters was associated with an increase in the mean annual response rate for follow-up from 36.4{\%} in the 5 years pre-targeted follow-up to 60.5{\%} in the 5 years post-targeted follow-up (p < 0.0001). Fifty percent of all successful follow-up responses were obtained within 70 days. Conclusion: Targeted follow-up letters were associated with increased followup success rates. Results also indicate that closing cases to follow-up information at 70 days would allow collection of 78{\%} of all follow-up that would ever arrive.",
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Improving follow-up rates in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting : effectiveness of a targeted letter used by a regional centre in the UK. / Anton, Christopher; Cox, Anthony R.; Ferner, Robin E.

In: Drug Safety, Vol. 32, No. 12, 31.12.2009, p. 1135-1140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Anton, Christopher

AU - Cox, Anthony R.

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