In vitro characterization of a collagen scaffold enzymatically cross-linked with a tailored elastin-like polymer

Yolanda Garcia, Naik Hemantkumar, Russell Collighan, Martin Griffin, Jose Carlos Rodriguez-Cabello, Abhay Pandit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Collagen, the main structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), provides tensile stiffness to different structures and organs against rupture. However, collagen tissue-engineered implants are hereto still lacking in mechanical strength. Attempts to create stiffer scaffolds have resulted in increased brittleness of the material, reducing the versatility of the original component. The hypothesis behind this research is that the introduction of an elastic element in the scaffold will enhance the mechanical properties of the collagen-based scaffolds, as elastin does in the ECM to prevent irreversible deformation. In this study, an elastin-like polymer (ELP) designed and synthesized using recombinant DNA methodology is used with the view to providing increased proteolytic resistance and increased functionality to the scaffolds by carrying specific sequences for microbial transglutaminase cross-linking, endothelial cell adhesion, and drug delivery. Evaluation of the effects that cross-linking ELP-collagen has on the physicochemical properties of the scaffold such as porosity, presence of cross-linking, thermal behavior, and mechanical strength demonstrated that the introduction of enzymatically resistant covalent bonds between collagen and ELP increases the mechanical strength of the scaffolds in a dose-dependent manner without significantly affecting the porosity or thermal properties of the original scaffold. Importantly, the scaffolds also showed selective behavior, in a dose (ELP)-dependent manner toward human umbilical vein endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells when compared to fibroblasts.
LanguageEnglish
Pages887-899
Number of pages13
JournalTissue Engineering: Parts A, B and C
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2009

Fingerprint

Elastin
Scaffolds (biology)
Collagen
Scaffolds
Polymers
Strength of materials
Porosity
Endothelial cells
Extracellular Matrix
Hot Temperature
Transglutaminases
Covalent bonds
Recombinant DNA
Cell adhesion
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Fibroblasts
Brittleness
Drug delivery
Cell Adhesion
Smooth Muscle Myocytes

Keywords

  • collagen
  • extracellular matrix
  • ECM
  • tissue-engineered implants
  • scaffold

Cite this

Garcia, Yolanda ; Hemantkumar, Naik ; Collighan, Russell ; Griffin, Martin ; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos ; Pandit, Abhay. / In vitro characterization of a collagen scaffold enzymatically cross-linked with a tailored elastin-like polymer. In: Tissue Engineering: Parts A, B and C. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 887-899.
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In vitro characterization of a collagen scaffold enzymatically cross-linked with a tailored elastin-like polymer. / Garcia, Yolanda; Hemantkumar, Naik; Collighan, Russell; Griffin, Martin; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; Pandit, Abhay.

In: Tissue Engineering: Parts A, B and C, Vol. 15, No. 4, 10.07.2009, p. 887-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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