Influencing online grocery innovation: anti-choice as a trigger for activity fragmentation and multi-tasking

Ronan de Kervenoael, Jonathan Elms, Alan Hallsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reveals how activity fragmentation and multi-tasking become tools of consumer anti-choice in the online grocery sector: facilitated by new technology practices that positively encourage anti-choice. This is demonstrated through five long-term ethnographic case studies of households in the Portsmouth area of England. All the respondents made some form of conscious effort to minimize the amount of time they spent in ‘big box’ grocery stores. They spend more time at home in planning, searching, socializing online, cumulating and fulfilling internet orders than if they had visited a store: something that all could easily do. The findings suggest the need for constant innovation by internet grocers if they are to remain in tune with dynamic consumer lifestyles and advances in technology. Examples of upcoming technologies requiring retailers to re-think their internet strategies are discussed in view of the possibilities offered by activity fragmentation and multi-tasking.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-163
Number of pages9
JournalFutures
Volume62
Issue numberPart B
Early online date26 Apr 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

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multiple stress
fragmentation
innovation
Internet
lifestyle
new technology
planning
Innovation
World Wide Web
Trigger
Grocery
Fragmentation
Multitasking
time

Keywords

  • online grocery shopping
  • activity fragmentation
  • multitasking
  • anti-choice

Cite this

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Influencing online grocery innovation : anti-choice as a trigger for activity fragmentation and multi-tasking. / de Kervenoael, Ronan; Elms, Jonathan; Hallsworth, Alan.

In: Futures, Vol. 62, No. Part B, 10.2014, p. 155-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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