Interferometric sensor interrogation using an arrayed waveguide grating

D.C.C. Norman, David J. Webb, R.D. Pechstedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We experimentally investigate the use of an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) to interrogate interferometric sensors. A single broad-band light source is used to illuminate the system. Reflected spectral information is directed to an AWG with integral photodetectors providing 40 electrical outputs. We show that using the dual-wavelength technique we can measure the length of a Fabry-Pérot cavity by determining the optical phase changes of the scanned interferometric pattern, which produced a maximum unambiguous range of 1440 μm with an active sensor and a maximum unambiguous range of 300 μm with the introduction of a second processing interferometer, which allows the sensor to be passive. © 2005 IEEE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-174
Number of pages3
JournalIEEE Photonics Technology Letters
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2005

Fingerprint

Arrayed waveguide gratings
interrogation
gratings
waveguides
sensors
Sensors
Photodetectors
Interferometers
photometers
Light sources
light sources
interferometers
broadband
Wavelength
cavities
output
Processing
wavelengths

Keywords

  • arrayed waveguide grating (AWG)
  • Fabry-Pérot
  • interferometric
  • Mach-Zehnder
  • sensor

Cite this

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Interferometric sensor interrogation using an arrayed waveguide grating. / Norman, D.C.C.; Webb, David J.; Pechstedt, R.D.

In: IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 172-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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