Is beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposition in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease related to blood vessels?

Richard A. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The density of the diffuse, primitive and classic beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and the incidence of large and small diameter blood vessels was studied in the upper laminae of the frontal cortex of 10 patients with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The data were analysed using the partial correlation coefficient to determine whether variations in the density of Abeta deposit subtypes along the cortex were related to blood vessels. Significant correlations between the density of the diffuse or primitive Abeta deposits and blood vessels were found in only a small number of patients. However, the classic Abeta deposits were positively correlated with the large blood vessels in all 10 patients, the correlations remaining when the effects of gyral location and mutual correlations between Abeta deposits were removed. These results suggest that the larger blood vessels are involved specifically in the formation of the classic Abeta deposits and are less important in the formation of the diffuse and primitive deposits.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-50
Number of pages4
JournalAlzheimer's Research
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Amyloid Plaques
Frontal Lobe
Amyloid
Blood Vessels
Alzheimer Disease
Incidence

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Abeta deposits
  • frontal cortex
  • blood vessels
  • partial correlation

Cite this

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abstract = "The density of the diffuse, primitive and classic beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and the incidence of large and small diameter blood vessels was studied in the upper laminae of the frontal cortex of 10 patients with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The data were analysed using the partial correlation coefficient to determine whether variations in the density of Abeta deposit subtypes along the cortex were related to blood vessels. Significant correlations between the density of the diffuse or primitive Abeta deposits and blood vessels were found in only a small number of patients. However, the classic Abeta deposits were positively correlated with the large blood vessels in all 10 patients, the correlations remaining when the effects of gyral location and mutual correlations between Abeta deposits were removed. These results suggest that the larger blood vessels are involved specifically in the formation of the classic Abeta deposits and are less important in the formation of the diffuse and primitive deposits.",
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Is beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposition in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease related to blood vessels? / Armstrong, Richard A.

In: Alzheimer's Research, Vol. 2, 1996, p. 47-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposition in the frontal cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease related to blood vessels?

AU - Armstrong, Richard A.

PY - 1996

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AB - The density of the diffuse, primitive and classic beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and the incidence of large and small diameter blood vessels was studied in the upper laminae of the frontal cortex of 10 patients with sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The data were analysed using the partial correlation coefficient to determine whether variations in the density of Abeta deposit subtypes along the cortex were related to blood vessels. Significant correlations between the density of the diffuse or primitive Abeta deposits and blood vessels were found in only a small number of patients. However, the classic Abeta deposits were positively correlated with the large blood vessels in all 10 patients, the correlations remaining when the effects of gyral location and mutual correlations between Abeta deposits were removed. These results suggest that the larger blood vessels are involved specifically in the formation of the classic Abeta deposits and are less important in the formation of the diffuse and primitive deposits.

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JF - Alzheimer's Research

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