Is psychological androgyny necessary for the hospitality graduate to become a manager?

Andy Roberts, Michael Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study examines the personality attributes hospitality employers deem necessary for new graduates’ success. Psychological androgyny—that has rarely been applied in a hospitality management context—underpins the study. Findings were that the smaller companies by employees expected androgynous characteristics from the graduate, while the medium and larger companies by employees expected higher levels of expressive—typically feminine—behaviours. These findings are not congruent with the existing literature, which has so often highlighted a “masculine supremacy effect.” The study concluded that psychological androgyny is a useful framework for the exploration of what hospitality employers expect from their graduate recruits.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-285
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Human Resources in Hospitality and Tourism
Volume9
Issue number3
Early online date5 Aug 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Employers
Employees
Hospitality
Psychological
Managers
effect
attribute
Small companies
Hospitality management
Large companies

Keywords

  • psychological androgyny
  • hospitality employers
  • expected graduate behaviours
  • expressiveness

Cite this

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Is psychological androgyny necessary for the hospitality graduate to become a manager? / Roberts, Andy; Butler, Michael.

In: Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality and Tourism, Vol. 9, No. 3, 2010, p. 270-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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