Is social partnership the way forward for Indian trade unions? Evidence from public services in India

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Trade unions in India find themselves excluded from the political process and marginalized in collective bargaining in the post economic reforms period since 1991. Influential policy analysts and academics alike have called upon Indian trade unions to engage in social partnership with employers as a route to regain influence and protect workers’ interests. Using survey and interview data from two large national trade union federations in Maharashtra India, this article examines whether social partnership is a viable option for Indian trade unions as an industrial relations approach. Findings indicate that despite a supportive labour regulatory framework which in theory should facilitate cooperative industrial relations, the ground realities of workplace employment relations coupled with state indifference and judicial interventions weakens labour’s prospects for meaningful social partnership.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-394
JournalInternational Labour Review
Volume156
Issue number3-4
Early online date12 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Industrial relations
Personnel
Regain
Economics
Trade unions
Public services
India
Social partnership
Labor
Work place
Political process
Analysts
Employment relations
Regulatory framework
Collective bargaining
Indifference
Employers
Workers
Federation
Economic reform

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Badigannavar, V. (2016). Is social partnership the way forward for Indian Trade Unions? Evidence from public services in India. International Labour Review, Early online, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ilr.12028. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Cite this

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Is social partnership the way forward for Indian trade unions? Evidence from public services in India. / Badigannavar, Vidu.

In: International Labour Review, Vol. 156, No. 3-4, 01.12.2017, p. 367-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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