Job performance measurement: the elusive relationship between job performance and job satisfaction

Stephen A. Woods*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This article reviews recent literature on job performance measurement to examine advances in theories of job performance measurement, and their implications for the practice of job performance assessment. It also considers the antecedents of job performance and, in particular, revisits the issue of whether happy, satisfied workers are also productive workers. The focus in the article is on measuring the job performance of individuals and teams, which most commonly involves the use of surveys or rating forms to assess and evaluate employee behavior or job competencies. Subjective ratings may be provided by supervisors, peers, subordinates, or clients and customers. Performance measurement may also make use of data from archival records (such as productivity or absence data), often referred to as objective data.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford handbook of personnel psychology
EditorsSusan Cartwright, Cary L. Cooper
Place of PublicationOxford (UK)
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages317-340
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-19-157709-3
ISBN (Print)978-0-19-923473-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

Keywords

  • employee behavior
  • job competencies
  • job performance
  • objective data
  • rating forms

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  • Cite this

    Woods, S. A. (2009). Job performance measurement: the elusive relationship between job performance and job satisfaction. In S. Cartwright, & C. L. Cooper (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of personnel psychology (pp. 317-340). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199234738.003.0014