Local-authority led economic regeneration strategies in the aftermath of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease crisis of 2001

Ian H. Taylor*, Mike J. Tricker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak of 2001 in the UK was completely unprecedented in its scale and severity, with over four million animals culled and a cost to the Exchequer of over £4 billion. Local authorities were at the front line in dealing with the outbreak, in coordinating the cull of livestock, the disposal of carcasses as well as attempting to deal with its aftermath and, in particular, the impact on the wider rural economy. This article examines the impacts of this crisis on three local authorities, Devon, Herefordshire and Cumbria. It examines how far the crisis acted as a catalyst in developing strategies to deal with a future outbreak as well as new local initiatives to promote regeneration in the areas most adversely affected. It focuses on developments that can be directly attributed to the crisis and shows that FMD had a considerable impact on communications and 'joined-up' activity within local authorities and with local stakeholders. © 2006, LEPU, South Bank University.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-291
Number of pages13
JournalLocal Economy
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006

Keywords

  • foot-and-mouth disease
  • outbreak
  • UK
  • cost
  • local authorities
  • rural economy

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